Another Landmark Case Loading: How did this one go

#1
The prominent Kenyan obstetrician and gynaecologist Dr John Nyamu remains in police custody after his arrest on 27 May last year on murder charges. Dr Nyamu is charged with unlawfully killing two fetuses that were among 15 found in rubbish bags near a Nairobi housing estate. His trial is set to start on 9 February. Charged jointly with him are two nurses, Ms Marion Wambui Kibathi and Ms Mercy Kaimuri Mathai.
According to police sources, autopsy results indicated that three of the fetuses were at least seven months old (40, 36, and 32 weeks) at the time the pregnancies were terminated. The fetuses were found in plastic bags by a river outside a Christian institution, together with medical waste and a register of patients from one of the clinics of Dr Nyamu's Reproductive Health Services company.

The discovery came three weeks after the release of a study of abortion in Kenya, conducted jointly by the Ministry of Health, the Kenya Medical Association, and two non-governmental organisations. The study, which covered only 60 public hospitals, estimated that up to 800 unsafe abortions are performed every day in Kenya, leading to an average of 2600 deaths each year. Several members of parliament called for the legalisation of abortion when the study was released.
At least four separate discoveries of aborted fetuses have been reported in the Kenyan press since the study's release. In September Nairobi area police chief Mr Kingori Mwangi reported that the police were “collecting two to three dead babies from various points in the city on a daily basis.” Two days later Emmanuel Ngugi, a Catholic priest, conducted a funeral mass for 20 fetuses found at a waste disposal site. Documents retrieved from the site led police to several clinics in poor parts of Nairobi, where they arrested several people.

Dr Nyamu's first court appearance on 10 November sparked a confrontation outside the courthouse between religious groups, led by Father Ngugi, and a group of doctors led by the chairman of the Kenya Medical Association, Dr Stephen Ochiel. Dr Ochiel has called on the association's 5000 members to raise funds for Dr Nyamu's defence. He has also criticised the decision to charge Dr Nyamu with murder, which carries the death penalty, rather than procuring abortions, which carries a 14 year jail term.

However, a group of about 400 members of the association, led by gynaecologists Dr Stephen Karanja and Dr Jean Kagia, oppose any show of support for Dr Nyamu. The chairman of the Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board, Professor Julius Kyambi, also opposes the association's stand. “Our position is that doctors should not go to court (to show solidarity with Dr Nyamu),” Professor Kyambi told the East African Standard newspaper. “The law has to take its own course.”

The law in Kenya remains restrictive, allowing the termination of a pregnancy only when a woman's life is in danger. Kenya's health minister, Mrs Charity Ngilu, has ruled out legalising abortion, while the president, Mr Mwai Kibaki, has urged Kenyans to “follow the teachings they got from teachers and preachers.”
Several Kenyan clinics that had been offering care for women who have had an abortion closed down last year after the withdrawal of funding by the US government in line with its “Mexico City policy,” also known as the “global gag rule,” under which the US government refuses aid to any organisation that offers abortion.
 
#6
The prominent Kenyan obstetrician and gynaecologist Dr John Nyamu remains in police custody after his arrest on 27 May last year on murder charges. Dr Nyamu is charged with unlawfully killing two fetuses that were among 15 found in rubbish bags near a Nairobi housing estate. His trial is set to start on 9 February. Charged jointly with him are two nurses, Ms Marion Wambui Kibathi and Ms Mercy Kaimuri Mathai.
According to police sources, autopsy results indicated that three of the fetuses were at least seven months old (40, 36, and 32 weeks) at the time the pregnancies were terminated. The fetuses were found in plastic bags by a river outside a Christian institution, together with medical waste and a register of patients from one of the clinics of Dr Nyamu's Reproductive Health Services company.

The discovery came three weeks after the release of a study of abortion in Kenya, conducted jointly by the Ministry of Health, the Kenya Medical Association, and two non-governmental organisations. The study, which covered only 60 public hospitals, estimated that up to 800 unsafe abortions are performed every day in Kenya, leading to an average of 2600 deaths each year. Several members of parliament called for the legalisation of abortion when the study was released.
At least four separate discoveries of aborted fetuses have been reported in the Kenyan press since the study's release. In September Nairobi area police chief Mr Kingori Mwangi reported that the police were “collecting two to three dead babies from various points in the city on a daily basis.” Two days later Emmanuel Ngugi, a Catholic priest, conducted a funeral mass for 20 fetuses found at a waste disposal site. Documents retrieved from the site led police to several clinics in poor parts of Nairobi, where they arrested several people.

Dr Nyamu's first court appearance on 10 November sparked a confrontation outside the courthouse between religious groups, led by Father Ngugi, and a group of doctors led by the chairman of the Kenya Medical Association, Dr Stephen Ochiel. Dr Ochiel has called on the association's 5000 members to raise funds for Dr Nyamu's defence. He has also criticised the decision to charge Dr Nyamu with murder, which carries the death penalty, rather than procuring abortions, which carries a 14 year jail term.

However, a group of about 400 members of the association, led by gynaecologists Dr Stephen Karanja and Dr Jean Kagia, oppose any show of support for Dr Nyamu. The chairman of the Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board, Professor Julius Kyambi, also opposes the association's stand. “Our position is that doctors should not go to court (to show solidarity with Dr Nyamu),” Professor Kyambi told the East African Standard newspaper. “The law has to take its own course.”

The law in Kenya remains restrictive, allowing the termination of a pregnancy only when a woman's life is in danger. Kenya's health minister, Mrs Charity Ngilu, has ruled out legalising abortion, while the president, Mr Mwai Kibaki, has urged Kenyans to “follow the teachings they got from teachers and preachers.”
Several Kenyan clinics that had been offering care for women who have had an abortion closed down last year after the withdrawal of funding by the US government in line with its “Mexico City policy,” also known as the “global gag rule,” under which the US government refuses aid to any organisation that offers abortion.
Haiya so this dude was arrested again! First time was in early 2000s...was a big case back then...his arrest marked the decline of his club, dimples, pale nakuru.
 
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