Dubai Police Start Training On Flying Motorbikes

Tehuti

Senior Villager
#1

Dubai Police Start Training On Flying Motorbikes

(CNN)- The flying motorbike is back in Dubai

A year after California-based startup Hoversurf showcased its hoverbike at tech expo GITEX in the white and green livery of the Dubai Police, the company has returned with a new model and evidence its electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) vehicle might be, well, taking off.

Making good on a deal signed in 2017, Hoversurf has now gifted Dubai Police its first serial production unit of the S3 2019 Hoverbike and has begun training officers to fly it.

Brigadier Khalid Nasser Alrazooqi, general director of Dubai Police's artificial intelligence department, described the eVTOL vehicle as a first responder unit used to access hard to reach areas. He said he aims to have hoverbikes in action by 2020.

Hoversurf S3 2019 Hoverbike

Weight: 253 lbs

Total thrust: 802 lbs

Max speed: 60 mph

Safe flying altitude: 16 ft

Flight time with pilot: 10-25 minutes

Flight time in drone mode: up to 40 minutes

Charge time: 2.5 hours

Price: $150,000

"Currently we have two crews already training (to pilot the hoverbike) and we're increasing the number," he told CNN. Hoversurf chief operating officer Joseph Segura-Conn explained that ideal candidates will be able to ride a motorcycle and have drone operating experiences. Video of one officer learning to pilot the hoverbike appeared online last month.

Segura-Conn said Dubai Police have exclusive rights to order as many units as they want: "They're going to let us know in the next month or two if they'd like any more ... If they would like 30 or 40, we'll make it happen for them."

If you're not a member of the force and have a spare $150,000, the hoverbike could still be yours. Orders are open to civilians, but Segura-Conn cautions that buyers are screened to ensure they can handle the new tech.

In the US, the hoverbike has met Federal Aviation Administration guidelines which mean you do not need a pilot's license to fly the vehicle.

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/11/08/...ce-flying-lessons/index.html?no-st=1541773452

fly police.jpg
 
#3
Mzungu ni mwerevu sana. hizi pesa amepea hawa watu nao wanatumia ujinga. siku supply itakatika watajua wamejenga nyumba kwa mchanga. anyway. this is their golden age.
 

Bark

Village Elder
#4
Mzungu ni mwerevu sana. hizi pesa amepea hawa watu nao wanatumia ujinga. siku supply itakatika watajua wamejenga nyumba kwa mchanga. anyway. this is their golden age.
counter:
Not really, I believe they are very much aware that oil reserves will deplete eventually... So what do they do, they diversify and survive.

Free trade zones, travel destination and a tech hub by it's own right. Tech is future and they are leading at that front or at least as a market of the same.
 
#5
counter:
Not really, I believe they are very much aware that oil reserves will deplete eventually... So what do they do, they diversify and survive.

Free trade zones, travel destination and a tech hub by it's own right. Tech is future and they are leading at that front or at least as a market of the same.
Even wealthiest nations that have stood the test of time know that cost cutting and practical systems are the most reliable. You will never see them pull these stunts no matter how much money they have. those arabs buy supercars and useless stuff than the wealthier billionares in the west where the money comes from. the arab believes in purchasing his way to anything.
 

Bark

Village Elder
#7
Even wealthiest nations that have stood the test of time know that cost cutting and practical systems are the most reliable. You will never see them pull these stunts no matter how much money they have. those arabs buy supercars and useless stuff than the wealthier billionares in the west where the money comes from. the arab believes in purchasing his way to anything.
touché:
Still hopeful that the splurging on "cool gadgets" will lead to ,at the very least, advancement in tech... after all there's always a trickle down effect if a solution is effective e.g. traffic jams are a problem in today's world thus solutions will start from outrageous one's like drones, hyperloop, autopilot systems and to even more cost-effective ones.

If you have a market to spend on the wild ideas, then the idea will have enough runtime to fine tune.

BUT I get your point, the Arab nations outsourcing everything might not be in their favour.

PS: Hyperloop is well on it's way in Dubai, UAE space race is on and obviously a lot more...
 
#8
touché:
Still hopeful that the splurging on "cool gadgets" will lead to ,at the very least, advancement in tech... after all there's always a trickle down effect if a solution is effective e.g. traffic jams are a problem in today's world thus solutions will start from outrageous one's like drones, hyperloop, autopilot systems and to even more cost-effective ones.

If you have a market to spend on the wild ideas, then the idea will have enough runtime to fine tune.

BUT I get your point, the Arab nations outsourcing everything might not be in their favour.

PS: Hyperloop is well on it's way in Dubai, UAE space race is on and obviously a lot more...
Well, experimentation has proven itself. but if those people bring in guys from holland to build everything and then they purchase all cool western made gadgets, I dont see any sustainability. But they arent bad at least they arent killing people like their other brothers.
 
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