f**k Christmas

BronxKE

Senior Villager
#1
Christmas is around, but truth be told, that shit has lost it's past hype. Back in the day for us who grew up in village, that day meant a lot. That is the only day we got to ride in a "personal car" when our cool auntie who lived in Nairobi came to shags for the feast. That was also a day to eat that big bread, queen cakes and also hang around your cute cousins who lived in the City, were of light skinned while the rest of your entire clan are as dark as that line/stich that runs below the msendes all the way to the bells..

BUT everything was not always rosy. On Chrismas day those of us who were born and bred in the village were treated like shit.. We were not even allowed to bathe while our cousins from the city were treated in a royal way. My grandpa would wake me up very early and tell me to go graze sheep some 5 kilometers away from the homestead as the cool cousins were left behind taking part in watching as goats were slaughtered, eating chapatis and eating top layer of meat.. I would come back late in the evening, dirty and smelling like a pig. By that time the cool cousins have already bathe and clad in expensive and exotic party clothes.. I would not be allowed even to wave at them. By that time meat has already been eaten and the only thing remaining is 'matharigo'(hooves of goats), that chapati that lost shape and burnt on the pan, soup already added water until fully diluted and 3 pieces of meat that everyone had previously rejected..

Those atrocities and historical injustices commited against me made me hate Christmas.. I actually NEVER go to grandpa's place for the feast for the last 8 yrs.. It's such mean treatment that shapes who we are today. If you bear me say "wekelea dry fry kilo moja, na uweke mahali umenona vizuri '' don't be shocked, I am trynna revenge for the crimes against humanity cimmited in the past.
 

gashwin

Village Chief
#3
Christmas is around, but truth be told, that shit has lost it's past hype. Back in the day for us who grew up in village, that day meant a lot. That is the only day we got to ride in a "personal car" when our cool auntie who lived in Nairobi came to shags for the feast. That was also a day to eat that big bread, queen cakes and also hang around your cute cousins who lived in the City, were of light skinned while the rest of your entire clan are as dark as that line/stich that runs below the msendes all the way to the bells..

BUT everything was not always rosy. On Chrismas day those of us who were born and bred in the village were treated like shit.. We were not even allowed to bathe while our cousins from the city were treated in a royal way. My grandpa would wake me up very early and tell me to go graze sheep some 5 kilometers away from the homestead as the cool cousins were left behind taking part in watching as goats were slaughtered, eating chapatis and eating top layer of meat.. I would come back late in the evening, dirty and smelling like a pig. By that time the cool cousins have already bathe and clad in expensive and exotic party clothes.. I would not be allowed even to wave at them. By that time meat has already been eaten and the only thing remaining is 'matharigo'(hooves of goats), that chapati that lost shape and burnt on the pan, soup already added water until fully diluted and 3 pieces of meat that everyone had previously rejected..

Those atrocities and historical injustices commited against me made me hate Christmas.. I actually NEVER go to grandpa's place for the feast for the last 8 yrs.. It's such mean treatment that shapes who we are today. If you bear me say "wekelea dry fry kilo moja, na uweke mahali umenona vizuri '' don't be shocked, I am trynna revenge for the crimes against humanity cimmited in the past.
i can relate, NV....But there's a time to drop the hurt and bitterness....
you remind me of one year i tricked my cousin so he could be the one to graze on christmas day. we had the duty of grazing on alternate days. being foresighted and noting that xmas day duty fell on me, i offered to graze on two consecutive days as if i was doing him a favor early in december only for it to dawn on him christmas morning that he was on duty. that was very mean of me...
 

kah tony

Village Elder
#6
i can relate, NV....But there's a time to drop the hurt and bitterness....
you remind me of one year i tricked my cousin so he could be the one to graze on christmas day. we had the duty of grazing on alternate days. being foresighted and noting that xmas day duty fell on me, i offered to graze on two consecutive days as if i was doing him a favor early in december only for it to dawn on him christmas morning that he was on duty. that was very mean of me...
What heathens would make people work or graze farm animals on Christmas day?

Sincerely ,
Cousin from Nairobi

Ion: second time today I nearly liked uncle nyams post. Lightning don't strike twice unless...
 

gashwin

Village Chief
#9
What heathens would make people work or graze farm animals on Christmas day?

Sincerely ,
Cousin from Nairobi

Ion: second time today I nearly liked uncle nyams post. Lightning don't strike twice unless...
man, if we didn't graze on christmas day where would you get milk on boxing day from, townie? perchance might you be the fabled boy who when they were leaving the supermarket with the mother reminded her she didn't show him where they keep the milkers?
 
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M

Miss Finest Wine

Guest
#10
Christmas is around, but truth be told, that shit has lost it's past hype. Back in the day for us who grew up in village, that day meant a lot. That is the only day we got to ride in a "personal car" when our cool auntie who lived in Nairobi came to shags for the feast. That was also a day to eat that big bread, queen cakes and also hang around your cute cousins who lived in the City, were of light skinned while the rest of your entire clan are as dark as that line/stich that runs below the msendes all the way to the bells..

BUT everything was not always rosy. On Chrismas day those of us who were born and bred in the village were treated like shit.. We were not even allowed to bathe while our cousins from the city were treated in a royal way. My grandpa would wake me up very early and tell me to go graze sheep some 5 kilometers away from the homestead as the cool cousins were left behind taking part in watching as goats were slaughtered, eating chapatis and eating top layer of meat.. I would come back late in the evening, dirty and smelling like a pig. By that time the cool cousins have already bathe and clad in expensive and exotic party clothes.. I would not be allowed even to wave at them. By that time meat has already been eaten and the only thing remaining is 'matharigo'(hooves of goats), that chapati that lost shape and burnt on the pan, soup already added water until fully diluted and 3 pieces of meat that everyone had previously rejected..

Those atrocities and historical injustices commited against me made me hate Christmas.. I actually NEVER go to grandpa's place for the feast for the last 8 yrs.. It's such mean treatment that shapes who we are today. If you bear me say "wekelea dry fry kilo moja, na uweke mahali umenona vizuri '' don't be shocked, I am trynna revenge for the crimes against humanity cimmited in the past.
So BronsKE...how have you changed the situation? I have laughed sana. As in what do you do on xmas day?
 

Purple

Moderator
Staff member
#12
Woishe I’m sorry your childhood memories of Christmas were not ideal. Either your grandpa didn’t like your parents, they were poor, or you were born out of wedlock. So you were treated like sh*t for it. I was a townie kid and I remember those ‘dirty’cousins who used to gawk at us when we came to shagz for Chrissy. Even today some have done well but there’s still ka ‘hierarchy’ thing with the cousins from shagz na wale wa town. We’re all adults but they still look at me and keep their distance like when we were kids. Terrible..
 

BronxKE

Senior Villager
#13
Woishe I’m sorry your childhood memories of Christmas were not ideal. Either your grandpa didn’t like your parents, they were poor, or you were born out of wedlock. So you were treated like sh*t for it. I was a townie kid and I remember those ‘dirty’cousins who used to gawk at us when we came to shagz for Chrissy. Even today some have done well but there’s still ka ‘hierarchy’ thing with the cousins from shagz na wale wa town. We’re all adults but they still look at me and keep their distance like when we were kids. Terrible..
Lol. That's hard mahn!
 
M

Miss Finest Wine

Guest
#17
Xmas is just a day when I just try my luck on one yellow yellow who has refused to go to shaggz
Nooo that does not work. Amekataa kwenda kwao kwa nini...pls piss off. Hata ikiwa watakuwa wakimunch githeri. Ni muheni? what is your normal handle? gerring a bit tiring around here.


Gosh even mboches will be leaving their places of work and gone kwao with pay and all that.
 

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