How the male praying mantis keeps its head during rough sex

GREY2020

Village Elder
#1
How the male praying mantis keeps its head during rough sex: Springboks WRESTLE with their female mates to avoid being eaten, study finds.
Courageous mantis males wrestle with their female mate to avoid being eaten, a new study reveals. New Zealand researchers looked at the mating behaviours of the highly cannibalistic springbok mantis (Miomantis caffra), a species of praying mantis.Praying mantises have a reputation for cannibalism, because females often eat males before they get a chance to mate.
But in this particular species, the male and female wrestle in a 'violent struggle' before mating, as each partner tries to be the first to grasp hold of the other with its front legs. If the female wins, it spells almost certain death for the male, but if the male wins it dramatically increase its chance of mating successfully, while often injuring the female in the process. Rather than avoiding cannibalism by being timid and cautious, males can overcome the threat of cannibalism by 'coercively wrestling females', the experts say. 60 per cent of sexual encounters between springbok mantises – which is one of nearly 2,000 mantis species across the globe – end in males being eaten.


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Red arrow indicates a healed abdominal wound on a female springbok mantis after an encounter with a male.

Males play Russian roulette whenever they encounter cannibalistic females,' Dr Burke said.'It is rare for males to avoid cannibalism by this form of coercion – physically fighting with females in order to successfully mate – and this is the first evidence of this behaviour in a cannibalistic mantis. 'Sexual conflict in the insect world is not that unusual and usually favours a cautious or tactical approach.'But the male springbok mantis really does fight to achieve his goal and this study shows that might be his best option in terms of reproductive success.'
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Male (top) female (bottom) Miomantis caffra mating in Auckland, New Zealand. The abdomen of the female is visibly bulging as she is carrying eggs from a prior mating encounter. The springbok mantis is native to Southern Africa, but is commonly found in New Zealand after first being identified there in 1978. The male was always the first to initiate contact and did so by leaping onto the female while rapidly fluttering his wings.
Almost all – 90 per cent – escalated into physical struggles, which lasted, on average, 12.77 seconds. Of these, 7 per cent resulted in separation without a winner.
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A female Miomantis caffra specimen laying her eggs. The species is a moderately sized mantid with one of the highest known rates of pre-copulatory cannibalism. More than 60 per cent of sexual interactions end in males being consumed, mostly without mating.
35 per cent of struggles resulted in the female grasping the male first, and all such struggles ended in cannibalism.

Males were the first to grasp hold of females in 58 per cent of struggles. Of these, 67 per cent ended in mating (half of which subsequently ended in cannibalism), 13 per cent ended in cannibalism without mating and 20 per cent ended in neither cannibalism nor mating. On several occasions, females that lost the struggle tried to grasp hold of attached males but were unsuccessful in doing so. Another unusual finding was that 27 per cent of females that lost the struggle were injured by the male’s foretibial claws.
 

BBIsiMuhimu

Village Elder
#3
Outside the city council home that I grew up in kulikuwa na a huge mzambarau (Java plum aka black plum aka jamun fruit) the tree that was imported from India where it is native during colonial time. Naturally that fruit attracted insects and those insects attracted praying mantises. Luhya kids told us they are called senene in Swahili. Hakuna kitu tulikuwa tumeogopa kuliko senene. Some kid told us that those things enter your nostrils and choke you to death and we naturally believed.
We played with ding'oing'o, dragon flies, locusts, bees but never praying mantises.
 

GREY2020

Village Elder
#6
Outside the city council home that I grew up in kulikuwa na a huge mzambarau (Java plum aka black plum aka jamun fruit) the tree that was imported from India where it is native during colonial time. Naturally that fruit attracted insects and those insects attracted praying mantises. Luhya kids told us they are called senene in Swahili. Hakuna kitu tulikuwa tumeogopa kuliko senene. Some kid told us that those things enter your nostrils and choke you to death and we naturally believed.
We played with ding'oing'o, dragon flies, locusts, bees but never praying mantises.
hahahah hahaha :D:D:D better you kept off
 

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