• Update: Movement within the Nairobi Metropolitan Area is permitted except for the national curfew period of between 7pm and 5am. What is prohibited is the movement IN and OUT of the Gazetted areas for the period of 21 days effective 7.00pm tonight 6th April 2020!

I just can't sleep

Jobi4

Village Elder
#21
I saw you peddle some fish gear around sometimes last year.

I think your target was @Kimakia and if I remember well; you were trying to offload some fishing gear on his ass but he humbly declined citing some anonymity concerns.

I hail from a fishing community so take my advice SERIOUSLY. Africans catch fish for food not for some sport or therapeutic reasons.

If you continue catching fish and casting them back to the waters for stress-relief; just know your days are numbered. The white man may do it without repercussions but for you, kumbuka wewe ni nyeuthi. Just don't do it. The curse of our forefathers will befall you.
Umeamulia huyu jamaa :D
 

Bottoms

Village Elder
#25
I told you fishing will never be the solution to your life's tribulations. Haukuniskia. You have to address the root problem. For you, 2019 was all about resigning from jobs and declining responsibilities. All for what?? Fishing??

Hizi mashida zimekukumba ni kwa sababu ya upumbavu wako. WAJIBIKA!!
Please talk English. I dont understand Dholuo
 
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bubudiu

Village Elder
#27
Please talk English. I dont understand Dholuo
You know he is right,do something about your situation.Not only the sleep part,but the bigger issue.It starts by speaking to the person you are closest to.
We may call each other names,rebuke each other name them,but losing a talker even though anonymously it can be touching.
 
#31
Ama ulale much later ndio siamke mapema
I will never forget that in 2015, you allowed your son to be escorted by your wife for circumcision in your absence. Even we Luos - who picked up circumcision as a rite of passage much later than other kenyan tribes - understand that this cannot happen. You cannot miss your Son's transition from Boyhood to Manhood for any reason whatsoever. You brought upon yourself a deleterious African curse.
 
#32
Please talk English. I dont understand Dholuo
You're one of the talkers who pretends not to know swahili on this forum. Why would feel ashamed of speaking the language of your country of birth? Why?

Just because you're domiciled in the US??

You have a strong contempt for African languages.
 
#33
@Bottoms I know you dislike most things kenyan; our traditions, our languages and our way of life.

But don't forget that we are among the least stressed people on this planet. There is a reason no one runs through our towns knifing or gunning people down except for terrorists. We have no lone-wolves here.

Our people are a superior generation that has been looked down upon by the white man...ever since he discovered gun-powder. But tables are turning slowly and Africanism will once again shine through.

Don't eschew our traditions in favour of western hobbies. Rowing your boat to the middle of the sea to catch a barracuda may sound fancy and awesome but it will never compare to serving a cup of smoky tea to a bunch of friends on a Saturday afternoon. Embrace our sense of community.
 

Bottoms

Village Elder
#34
You're one of the talkers who pretends not to know swahili on this forum. Why would feel ashamed of speaking the language of your country of birth? Why?

Just because you're domiciled in the US??

You have a strong contempt for African languages.
Dont blame me for not knowing swahili that much. I came here when I was 3 . My dad and mum are from Siaya. Why should you blame me for not talking fluent swahili yet I dont interact with our people here since I was young ? In fact where i live there are no africans apart from the college I went to? Dont blame me on something I dont have control over. I do understand most of the things but I cant talk fluently and can write alittle bit with the help of google.

Your reasoning is like blaming someone like Obama for not being able to speak Dholuo even though his dad is from Nyanza..
 
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Bottoms

Village Elder
#35
Our people are a superior generation that has been looked down upon by the white man...ever since he discovered gun-powder. But tables are turning slowly and Africanism will once again shine through.
I agree with you here
Don't eschew our traditions in favour of western hobbies. Rowing your boat to the middle of the sea to catch a barracuda may sound fancy and awesome but it will never compare to serving a cup of smoky tea to a bunch of friends on a Saturday afternoon. Embrace our sense of community.
Where I live and work no one has ever introduced me to hobbies that our people like and by any chance dont our dholuo people like fishing ? Isnt that what I'm doing currently.

I find you to be judging me too harshly at times. I have no control on some things . Another thing I'm not a depressed kind of a person. The last depression I had was when my wife left with my two kids after a nasty divorce . I got over it and we have now joint custody. I used more than 30 grand for joint custody shenanigans and I'm happy it bore fruits . I dont have any stress and if I do my mum and dad are always here. Niko poa rafiki hakuna wasiwasi.
 

Bottoms

Village Elder
#36
I will never forget that in 2015, you allowed your son to be escorted by your wife for circumcision in your absence. Even we Luos - who picked up circumcision as a rite of passage much later than other kenyan tribes - understand that this cannot happen. You cannot miss your Son's transition from Boyhood to Manhood for any reason whatsoever. You brought upon yourself a deleterious African curse.
You are the most negative person I have ever read stuff from
 

Mangele

Village Elder
#37
During normal sleep, you cycle through REM and four stages of non-REM (NREM) sleep numerous times a night. Stage 1 of NREM sleep is the lightest, while stage 4 is the deepest.
When you're repeatedly interrupted and can't cycle normally through these types and stages of sleep, you may feel tired, fatigued, and have trouble concentrating and paying attention while you're awake. Sleepiness puts you at greater risk for car wrecks and other accidents.

What Are Sleep Disorders?

Circadian Rhythm Disorders
Typically, people sleep at night -- thanks not only to the conventions of the 9-to-5 workday but also to the close interaction between our natural sleep and alertness rhythms, which are driven by an internal "clock."
This clock is a small part of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. It sits just above the nerves leaving the back of our eyes. Light and exercise "reset" the clock and can move it forward or backward. Abnormalities related to this clock are called circadian rhythm disorders ("circa" means "about," and "dies" means "day").
Circadian rhythm disorders include jet lag, adjustments to shift work, delayed sleep phase syndrome (you fall asleep and wake up too late), and advanced sleep phase syndrome (you fall asleep and wake up too early).

Insomnia
People who have insomnia don't feel as if they get enough sleep at night. They may have trouble falling asleep or may wake up frequently during the night or early in the morning. Insomnia is a problem if it affects your daytime activities. Insomnia has many possible causes, including stress, anxiety, depression, poor sleep habits, circadian rhythm disorders (such as jet lag), and taking certain medications.

Insomnia may be temporary and stem from a simple cause, such as jet lag. Short-term insomnia may also be caused by an illness, a stressful event, or drinking too much coffee, for example. Many medications have insomnia as a side effect.
Long-term insomnia may be caused by stress, depression, or anxiety. People can also become conditioned to insomnia: They associate bedtime with difficulty, expect to have trouble sleeping (and thus do), and become irritable (which can cause more insomnia). This cycle can be maintained for several years.
Circadian rhythm disorders are an important but less common cause of insomnia. People who abuse alcohol or drugs often suffer from insomnia.


Snoring
Many adults snore. The noise is produced when the air you inhale rattles over the relaxed tissues of the throat. Snoring can be a problem simply because of the noise it causes. It may also be a marker of a more serious sleep problem called sleep apnea.

Sleep Apnea
Sleep apnea occurs when the upper airway becomes completely or partially blocked, interrupting regular breathing for short periods of time -- which then wakes you up. It can cause severe daytime sleepiness. If left untreated, severe sleep apnea may be associated with high blood pressure and the risk of stroke and heart attack.

When you fall asleep, many muscles in your body relax. If muscles in the throat relax too much, your breathing may be blocked and you may snore. Sometimes, snoring is caused by allergies, asthma, or nasal deformities that make breathing difficult.
Apnea means "no airflow." Obstructive sleep apnea was thought to be a disorder primarily of overweight, older men. But abnormal breathing during sleep can affect people of any age, any weight, and either sex. Researchers now know that in many cases of sleep apnea, the obstruction in the airways is only partial. Most people with sleep apnea have a smaller-than-normal inner throat and other subtle bone and soft-tissue differences.
Drops in blood oxygen during sleep -- once thought to be the cause of waking up due to obstructive sleep apnea -- may or may not be present. Most likely, awakening occurs with the body's increased effort required to overcome the obstruction of the airway.
Drinking alcohol can make obstructive sleep apnea worse because it relaxes muscles that maintain an open airway.
A rare form of sleep apnea called central sleep apnea occurs when signals from the brain to your muscles decrease or stop for a short time. You may not snore if you have central sleep apnea.


Narcolepsy
Narcolepsy
is a brain disorder that causes excessive daytime sleepiness. There is sometimes a genetic component, but most patients have no family history of the problem. Though dramatic and uncontrolled "sleep attacks" have been the best-known feature of narcolepsy, in reality, many patients do not have sleep attacks. Instead, they experience constant sleepiness during the day.

The cause of narcolepsy is not clear. Genetic and environmental factors likely play a role, although the data on genetic factors is still speculative and not well studied. There are some rare nerve disorders that may be linked to narcolepsy.

Restless Legs Syndrome
In people who have restless legs syndrome, discomfort in the legs and feet peaks during the evening and night. They feel an urge to move their legs and feet to get temporary relief, often with excessive, rhythmic, or cyclic leg movements during sleep. This can delay sleep onset and cause a brief awakening during sleep. Restless legs syndrome is a common problem among middle-aged and older adults.

There are many possible causes of restless legs syndrome, including kidney failure, nerve disorders, vitamin and iron deficiencies, pregnancy, and some medications (such as antidepressants). Recent studies have shown a strong genetic link and researchers have been able to isolate a gene that may be responsible for at least 40% of all cases of the disorder.

Nightmares
Nightmares are frightening dreams that arise during REM sleep. They can be caused by stress, anxiety, and some drugs. Often, there is no clear cause.

Nightmares can be triggered by a frightening or stressful event, fever or illness, or use of some medications or alcohol.

Night Terrors and Sleepwalking
Both night terrors and sleepwalking arise during NREM sleep and occur most often in children between the ages of 3 and 5 years old. A night terror can be dramatic: Your child may wake up screaming, but unable to explain the fear. Sometimes children who have night terrors remember a frightening image, but often they remember nothing. Night terrors are often more frightening for parents than for their children. Sleepwalkers can perform a range of activities -- some potentially dangerous, like leaving the house -- while they continue to sleep.

Night terrors are most common in pre-school children, but they also can affect adults who are experiencing emotional or psychological problems.

Other Things that Impact Sleep
Young age. Infants may sleep up to 16 hours a day. But most won't sleep through the night without feeding until 4 months of age. School-aged children may sleep 10 hours a day. Their sleep may be disturbed by an illness or fever. Call your doctor if your child has a fever and is sluggish when waking up.

Old age. People over age 60 may not sleep as deeply as younger people. Sleep apnea is also more common among older people.

Lifestyle. People who drink coffee, smoke cigarettes, or drink alcohol are more likely to have sleep problems than people who do not.

Medication. Many drugs can cause sleeplessness. Others can cause daytime fatigue.

Depression and anxiety. Insomnia is a common symptom of depression and anxiety.

Heart failure and lung problems. Some people find it difficult to sleep at night because they become breathless when they lie down. This can be a symptom of heart failure or a problem with the lungs.

Slept at 11.30pm and while up at 4am. Been awake since. It's a daily pattern. Is this normal.
 
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Jobi4

Village Elder
#38
During normal sleep, you cycle through REM and four stages of non-REM (NREM) sleep numerous times a night. Stage 1 of NREM sleep is the lightest, while stage 4 is the deepest.
When you're repeatedly interrupted and can't cycle normally through these types and stages of sleep, you may feel tired, fatigued, and have trouble concentrating and paying attention while you're awake. Sleepiness puts you at greater risk for car wrecks and other accidents.

What Are Sleep Disorders?

Circadian Rhythm Disorders
Typically, people sleep at night -- thanks not only to the conventions of the 9-to-5 workday but also to the close interaction between our natural sleep and alertness rhythms, which are driven by an internal "clock."
This clock is a small part of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. It sits just above the nerves leaving the back of our eyes. Light and exercise "reset" the clock and can move it forward or backward. Abnormalities related to this clock are called circadian rhythm disorders ("circa" means "about," and "dies" means "day").
Circadian rhythm disorders include jet lag, adjustments to shift work, delayed sleep phase syndrome (you fall asleep and wake up too late), and advanced sleep phase syndrome (you fall asleep and wake up too early).

Insomnia
People who have insomnia don't feel as if they get enough sleep at night. They may have trouble falling asleep or may wake up frequently during the night or early in the morning. Insomnia is a problem if it affects your daytime activities. Insomnia has many possible causes, including stress, anxiety, depression, poor sleep habits, circadian rhythm disorders (such as jet lag), and taking certain medications.

Insomnia may be temporary and stem from a simple cause, such as jet lag. Short-term insomnia may also be caused by an illness, a stressful event, or drinking too much coffee, for example. Many medications have insomnia as a side effect.
Long-term insomnia may be caused by stress, depression, or anxiety. People can also become conditioned to insomnia: They associate bedtime with difficulty, expect to have trouble sleeping (and thus do), and become irritable (which can cause more insomnia). This cycle can be maintained for several years.
Circadian rhythm disorders are an important but less common cause of insomnia. People who abuse alcohol or drugs often suffer from insomnia.


Snoring
Many adults snore. The noise is produced when the air you inhale rattles over the relaxed tissues of the throat. Snoring can be a problem simply because of the noise it causes. It may also be a marker of a more serious sleep problem called sleep apnea.

Sleep Apnea
Sleep apnea occurs when the upper airway becomes completely or partially blocked, interrupting regular breathing for short periods of time -- which then wakes you up. It can cause severe daytime sleepiness. If left untreated, severe sleep apnea may be associated with high blood pressure and the risk of stroke and heart attack.

When you fall asleep, many muscles in your body relax. If muscles in the throat relax too much, your breathing may be blocked and you may snore. Sometimes, snoring is caused by allergies, asthma, or nasal deformities that make breathing difficult.
Apnea means "no airflow." Obstructive sleep apnea was thought to be a disorder primarily of overweight, older men. But abnormal breathing during sleep can affect people of any age, any weight, and either sex. Researchers now know that in many cases of sleep apnea, the obstruction in the airways is only partial. Most people with sleep apnea have a smaller-than-normal inner throat and other subtle bone and soft-tissue differences.
Drops in blood oxygen during sleep -- once thought to be the cause of waking up due to obstructive sleep apnea -- may or may not be present. Most likely, awakening occurs with the body's increased effort required to overcome the obstruction of the airway.
Drinking alcohol can make obstructive sleep apnea worse because it relaxes muscles that maintain an open airway.
A rare form of sleep apnea called central sleep apnea occurs when signals from the brain to your muscles decrease or stop for a short time. You may not snore if you have central sleep apnea.


Narcolepsy
Narcolepsy
is a brain disorder that causes excessive daytime sleepiness. There is sometimes a genetic component, but most patients have no family history of the problem. Though dramatic and uncontrolled "sleep attacks" have been the best-known feature of narcolepsy, in reality, many patients do not have sleep attacks. Instead, they experience constant sleepiness during the day.

The cause of narcolepsy is not clear. Genetic and environmental factors likely play a role, although the data on genetic factors is still speculative and not well studied. There are some rare nerve disorders that may be linked to narcolepsy.

Restless Legs Syndrome
In people who have restless legs syndrome, discomfort in the legs and feet peaks during the evening and night. They feel an urge to move their legs and feet to get temporary relief, often with excessive, rhythmic, or cyclic leg movements during sleep. This can delay sleep onset and cause a brief awakening during sleep. Restless legs syndrome is a common problem among middle-aged and older adults.

There are many possible causes of restless legs syndrome, including kidney failure, nerve disorders, vitamin and iron deficiencies, pregnancy, and some medications (such as antidepressants). Recent studies have shown a strong genetic link and researchers have been able to isolate a gene that may be responsible for at least 40% of all cases of the disorder.

Nightmares
Nightmares are frightening dreams that arise during REM sleep. They can be caused by stress, anxiety, and some drugs. Often, there is no clear cause.

Nightmares can be triggered by a frightening or stressful event, fever or illness, or use of some medications or alcohol.

Night Terrors and Sleepwalking
Both night terrors and sleepwalking arise during NREM sleep and occur most often in children between the ages of 3 and 5 years old. A night terror can be dramatic: Your child may wake up screaming, but unable to explain the fear. Sometimes children who have night terrors remember a frightening image, but often they remember nothing. Night terrors are often more frightening for parents than for their children. Sleepwalkers can perform a range of activities -- some potentially dangerous, like leaving the house -- while they continue to sleep.

Night terrors are most common in pre-school children, but they also can affect adults who are experiencing emotional or psychological problems.

Other Things that Impact Sleep
Young age. Infants may sleep up to 16 hours a day. But most won't sleep through the night without feeding until 4 months of age. School-aged children may sleep 10 hours a day. Their sleep may be disturbed by an illness or fever. Call your doctor if your child has a fever and is sluggish when waking up.

Old age. People over age 60 may not sleep as deeply as younger people. Sleep apnea is also more common among older people.

Lifestyle. People who drink coffee, smoke cigarettes, or drink alcohol are more likely to have sleep problems than people who do not.

Medication. Many drugs can cause sleeplessness. Others can cause daytime fatigue.

Depression and anxiety. Insomnia is a common symptom of depression and anxiety.

Heart failure and lung problems. Some people find it difficult to sleep at night because they become breathless when they lie down. This can be a symptom of heart failure or a problem with the lungs.
Sasa wewe pia umekua Kapondi. Anyone can Google what you've posted. Even the OP.
Looong posts za nini?
 

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