ISN'T THIS SOMETHING? TOYOTA

hunningale

Village Elder
#1
The 2010 mark x.. i find the interior abit shitty. But the size, muscle and curves is what you can die for.
Diclaimer:english is my third language _5_.jpg _6_.jpg

Any Experiences??
 
#13
Space where? In the engine bay?
Transverse FWD kind of mounting means that the bonnet is shorter, no gearbox or propeller between the seats in the cabin, and no differential at the rear. all the machinery is at the very front and rest of the car can be moulded for space and comfort. The kind of powerplant and configuration in the mark X can only fit well into a car like the crown, but then the car cannot be sporty because it is big. mark X had to be the way it is. it had to be small and still accomodate that powerplant, drive train and big wheels. The car is made like a two door performance vehicle but they decided to cram everything in there.
 
#16
Copy/Paste -- http://my.is/forums/f41/new-jdm-toyota-mark-x-its-not-next-231106/#post3068102

Here are a few points.

1. My understanding is that the Lexus design center is off limits to Toyota designers. You cannot expect to get accurate ideas regarding future Lexus models by viewing the Toyota.jp web pages (unless they are talking specifically about Lexus). Toyota is planning to sell the next generation Lexus sedans in Japan under the Lexus banner. Lexus vehicles will no longer be re- badged JDM Toyotas.


2. Almost every Toyota sold in Japan can be had with a four wheel drive option.


3. They did sell the Mark II in the US. Like the IS and GS, it was a rear-wheel drive sedan that used a Supra in-line 6 Engine without the turbo option. In the US it was called the Cressida and was replaced with the Avalon (which was sold as the Pronard in Japan).

I am sure most of you know that the Avalon/Pronard is not an evolution of the Cressida. It is a front wheel drive V6 sharing the same platform as the Camry and the Windom/ES.

The Mark II platform evolved a branch in Japan called the Cresta which later became the Verossa. The Cresta continued the old boxy styling of the older Mark II/Cressida. The Cresta and Verossa were never sold in the US and are no longer sold in Japan.

The Mark II/Cressida really is the great grandmother of the GS300 and IS300.

Here is a great link with a history of the Cressida: http://cressida.christurner.net/history/

It now looks like the Mark II is evolving into the Mark X. They are abondoning the I6 in favor of the new V6 and appropriatly renaming the vehicle. I am sad to see the I6 go; I always admired its smooth quiet performace.


Here is a nice history of the M serries engine which evolved into the JZ:
http://www4.tpgi.com.au/users/loats/.../mhistory.html.

Finally, I do own a 1987 Cressida (aka Mark II). I liked driving a large sedan with a Supra engine. I enjoy my new SportCross even more, a small wagon with a Supra engine.


This is one of the things I don't like about Toyota. They're constantly changing and repositioning brands/models it's so hard to build up brand/model loyalty. The few casualties that come to mind
  1. Startlet
  2. Carina
  3. Celica
  4. Camry
  5. Supra
  6. (Feel free to add yours)
 
P

Philip J. Fry

Guest
#17
Copy/Paste -- http://my.is/forums/f41/new-jdm-toyota-mark-x-its-not-next-231106/#post3068102

Here are a few points.

1. My understanding is that the Lexus design center is off limits to Toyota designers. You cannot expect to get accurate ideas regarding future Lexus models by viewing the Toyota.jp web pages (unless they are talking specifically about Lexus). Toyota is planning to sell the next generation Lexus sedans in Japan under the Lexus banner. Lexus vehicles will no longer be re- badged JDM Toyotas.


2. Almost every Toyota sold in Japan can be had with a four wheel drive option.


3. They did sell the Mark II in the US. Like the IS and GS, it was a rear-wheel drive sedan that used a Supra in-line 6 Engine without the turbo option. In the US it was called the Cressida and was replaced with the Avalon (which was sold as the Pronard in Japan).

I am sure most of you know that the Avalon/Pronard is not an evolution of the Cressida. It is a front wheel drive V6 sharing the same platform as the Camry and the Windom/ES.

The Mark II platform evolved a branch in Japan called the Cresta which later became the Verossa. The Cresta continued the old boxy styling of the older Mark II/Cressida. The Cresta and Verossa were never sold in the US and are no longer sold in Japan.

The Mark II/Cressida really is the great grandmother of the GS300 and IS300.

Here is a great link with a history of the Cressida: http://cressida.christurner.net/history/

It now looks like the Mark II is evolving into the Mark X. They are abondoning the I6 in favor of the new V6 and appropriatly renaming the vehicle. I am sad to see the I6 go; I always admired its smooth quiet performace.


Here is a nice history of the M serries engine which evolved into the JZ:
http://www4.tpgi.com.au/users/loats/.../mhistory.html.

Finally, I do own a 1987 Cressida (aka Mark II). I liked driving a large sedan with a Supra engine. I enjoy my new SportCross even more, a small wagon with a Supra engine.


This is one of the things I don't like about Toyota. They're constantly changing and repositioning brands/models it's so hard to build up brand/model loyalty. The few casualties that come to mind
  1. Startlet
  2. Carina
  3. Celica
  4. Camry
  5. Supra
  6. (Feel free to add yours)
kwa starlet nakubaliana na wewe, that car has so much room for performance improvement and to date has a huge community worldwide and specifically UK.
 
#18
Toyota capitalizes on the working class penchant for new latest stuff. Even when models name remain, total redesign, often downgrading the specs, pushes falling sales up. succeeding models of classy toyota vehicles may sometimes be simpler and base despite being a total redesign altogether.
 

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