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Jubilee Dev - Gok pays 22,244 for each student joining public secondary school

spear

Village Sponsor
#1
Good news for parents as State slashes school fees
By Augustine Oduor
Published: Nov 6th 2017 at 22:37, Updated: Nov 6th 2017 at 22:38


Form Four candidates of Langata Boys High school in Nairobi revise for chemistry paper 1 at their school, over 615,772 students are sitting for KSCE exams this year. 6/11/17. [Beverlyne Musili,Standard]
SUMMARY
New guidelines released by the Ministry of Education say all day scholars will not pay. Implementation of free day secondary education is dated October 19, 2017 and signed by Education PS Belio Kipsang. It’s now official that parents have been relieved the burden of fees in day secondary schools as the Government rolls out free education. And those with children in boarding secondary schools will pay a maximum of Sh53,000 after the Government increased the subsidy. Finer details of the much-awaited programme reveal the State will now pay Sh22,244 per child annually.
Currently, each student receives Sh12,870 per year from the Government and each parent is required to pay Sh9,374 per year in fees. This will not be the case anymore.
New guidelines released by the Ministry of Education say all day secondary schools will be free. Parents will only be required to buy school uniforms for their children, meet lunch costs and the boarding-related levies that will only be reflected in fee structures. Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang'i told Parliament last year that county education officials would take full responsibility of schools in their regions.

This means that editing levies in fees structure must be authorised. Parents will also be required to clear all balances for continuing students accrued before January 2018.
The guidelines released yesterday, however, state all day secondary education fees will paid by the Government.

“In order to ensure a 100 per cent transition for learners and remove the burden from parents, the parent component of Sh9,374 has been taken up and as such, learners in day-schools will not pay any fees,” reads the circular.

This means that each child will get an additional Sh9,374. The guidelines for the implementation of free day secondary education is dated October 19, 2017 and signed by Education PS Belio Kipsang. The document says that the Government will take care of all the vote heads in day secondary schools.
This means that teaching and learning materials, repairs and maintenance, local travel and transport and all administrative costs of schools will be met by the Government. However, it will be the responsibility of schools' boards of management to recruit non-teaching staff.

“To minimise the cost of secondary education, it is necessary to rationalise the recruitment of non-teaching staff. It shall be responsibility of parents to hire them at terms commensurate with qualifications and capacity to pay,” reads the circular.

Kipsang said the Government would release first tranche of free secondary education money next month.

“The first disbursement in December and subsequent disbursements are in April and August each year or as resources flow from the Treasury,” he said.

And for boarding schools, days of paying up to Sh100,000 in fees are over. The highest fees will now be Sh53,554, for both national and extra-county schools.
 

pipinono

Village Elder
#5
...
Sasa ngoja uambiwe vile quality itakua mbovu. Tulia tu hapo wana come
Wacha nikuwe wakwanza.

This will be the death bed for quality education in our secondary schools. We have a perfect case study with the FPE but we didn't learn.

What measures has the GOK done to reverse the effects of FEP which can still be felt to date @spear

Siasa kando!
 
#6
...

Wacha nikuwe wakwanza.

This will be the death bed for quality education in our secondary schools. We have a perfect case study with the FPE but we didn't learn.

What measures has the GOK done to reverse the effects of FEP which can still be felt to date @spear

Siasa kando!
What is wrong with FPE for those of us who don't know? I see it's working just fine where I am or am I missing something?
 

pipinono

Village Elder
#8
What is wrong with FPE for those of us who don't know? I see it's working just fine where I am or am I missing something?
You must be a tourist visiting Kenya for the first time

"The history of free primary education in Kenya as launched in 1974, 1979 and 2003 is replete with frustrations and disappointments. While the politicians went on basking over huge enrolments, often going up to over one million, the burden on basic learning facilities such as classrooms had never been well thought-out."
Read more at: https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/art...-nothing-if-it-s-bereft-of-quality-and-equity

https://www.the-star.co.ke/news/2016/10/25/the-plight-of-free-primary-education_c1439889
 

spear

Village Sponsor
#9
...

Wacha nikuwe wakwanza.

This will be the death bed for quality education in our secondary schools. We have a perfect case study with the FPE but we didn't learn.

What measures has the GOK done to reverse the effects of FEP which can still be felt to date @spear

Siasa kando!
I presume there are two things which you wish to know about.

1. Schools infrastructure I.e classes, dorms, dinning hall, libraries, toilets, playing fields and learning equipments.

2. Improved quality of education.

My respond is this and please note its a personal opinion.

1. Ministry of Education realises SIP grants every year to handle school infrastructure. Last year it was provided to 3654 schools countrywide. Usually the schools management headed by Principal/headmaster presents projects to the schools board of governors (BoG) which has representative from national government, county government, union and parents through PTA (Parents Teachers Association). Find out if you know any of them, find out what was their allocation, did they meet, did they plan, did they inform parents and if it was done/followed through.

2. On quality education, Kenya Primary Education Development Project (KPED) received $88.4 million from GPE (Global Partnership for Education) to enhance quality of teaching through training and equipment's for particularly maths and science. Its ongoing countrywide.

Lastly education needs everyone contributions. For example each MCA gets an average 100 million for ward development per year from county government. Can the local citizen make sure they push that at least every year some 10 million minimum goes to building or renovating schools on top of the funds I have mentioned above. Same can be done with CDF funds.
 
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sitaki

Village Elder
#10
good move, but we still have very many kids not getting secondary education, I think focus should have been more on universal secondary education, and the government converting the public institutions to day school, then the free secondary education will make more sense.
 

gashwin

Village Chief
#12
You must be a tourist visiting Kenya for the first time

"The history of free primary education in Kenya as launched in 1974, 1979 and 2003 is replete with frustrations and disappointments. While the politicians went on basking over huge enrolments, often going up to over one million, the burden on basic learning facilities such as classrooms had never been well thought-out."
Read more at: https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/art...-nothing-if-it-s-bereft-of-quality-and-equity

https://www.the-star.co.ke/news/2016/10/25/the-plight-of-free-primary-education_c1439889
your county government and CDF now have money to improve schools, two classes at a time (or per financial year)....unless you come from Kilifi or Siaya counties....
 

spear

Village Sponsor
#14
your county government and CDF now have money to improve schools, two classes at a time (or per financial year)....unless you come from Kilifi or Siaya counties....
In fact now prefabricated houses makes it possible to build two new Primary and Secondary school in several ward a year. Within 10 years that county has sorted its education needs.
 

sitaki

Village Elder
#15
remove the boarding nonsense
I think the boarding thing in secondary schools has really limited the growth in the education sector, this is a colonial relic that we still hold on.
I think a more drastic change with the new curriculum would have been to abolish the current secondary schools as they are now, add more classes to the existing primary school and let all, or majority of kids move from primary to secondary school and converts all existing boarding high schools to community/vocational colleges.
 

WuTang

Village Chief
#17
I think the boarding thing in secondary schools has really limited the growth in the education sector, this is a colonial relic that we still hold on.
I think a more drastic change with the new curriculum would have been to abolish the current secondary schools as they are now, add more classes to the existing primary school and let all, or majority of kids move from primary to secondary school and converts all existing boarding high schools to community/vocational colleges.
IMO, boarding schools should have options for day scholars living nearby. That way, they can accommodate more students who would otherwise be denied access to secondary education.
 
#18
The way i see it the problem is not the government. The problem is parents who want quality but do not want to pay even a cent. Most schools do not have enough teachers and parents are reluctant to chip in and employ additional teachers/ support staff and hot lunches etc. Those that do are doing very well and are very competitive at very small cost to parents.
 

sitaki

Village Elder
#19
IMO, boarding schools should have options for day scholars living nearby. That way, they can accommodate more students who would otherwise be denied access to secondary education.
true, but the key point is access to secondary education, which I think in the day and age we are in should be universal, not only for academic purposes, but also for keeping the 13 - 18 year olds in school. and the best way would be to ensure that all the kids who finish primary school have a position at a secondary school, and we can not achieve that with the segregation that we have with kcpe and the few secondary schools around also factor in the cost of boarding schools.
 

sitaki

Village Elder
#20
The way i see it the problem is not the government. The problem is parents who want quality but do not want to pay even a cent. Most schools do not have enough teachers and parents are reluctant to chip in and employ additional teachers/ support staff and hot lunches etc. Those that do are doing very well and are very competitive at very small cost to parents.
I don't think it is a small cost, I am in a group that supports kids from under-privileged backgrounds in secondary schools, and for most families asking them to pay 50k plus per year is just impossible so the kids end up not finishing school.
 

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