KENYA WILDLIFE SERVICE (KWS) DECLARED TECHNICALLY INSOLVENT

Bantu

Village Elder
#1
The Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) has accumulated Sh4.4 billion in losses that have left it technically insolvent, according to a newly-released report on the agency’s finances.

Auditor- General Edward Ouko says KWS, which is the primary State agency charged with wildlife conservation, reported a deficit of Sh680.5 million in the financial year ended June 2015, its latest audited period.

This came on the back of a Sh3.7 billion deficit that the agency had accumulated in the year to June 2014, pushing the total to Sh4.4 billion.

“During the year under review, the service recorded a deficit of Sh680.5 million…bringing accumulated deficit to Sh4.4 billion,” Mr Ouko says in a qualified audit report he submitted to Parliament last week.

Mr Ouko says the continued sustainability of the service is therefore dependent on regular government, creditors and/or development partners’ support.

“This scenario is untenable considering the vital importance of wildlife conservation for the present and future generations as envisioned in the Constitution of Kenya,” Mr Ouko says in the audit report dated June 16, 2016.

The KWS has continued to record deficits that mainly arise from compensation claims for victims of wildlife attacks as well as destruction of property by wild animals.
KWS blames the huge compensation claims on Parliament’s decision to amend the Wildlife Management and Conservation Act 2013 that left the taxpayer with a Sh4.83 billion bill by end of June 2016.

The law requires KWS to pay a minimum Sh5 million compensation for every life lost. The KWS wants Parliament to review the compensation rates to levels the agency can afford to pay from own revenues.

The Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources says the compensation claims for death and injury alone stood at Sh2.3 billion by June 2016.

Michael Kipkeu, senior assistant director of community wildlife service at the KWS, last year told the National Assembly’s Environment and Natural Resources committee that the bulk of the compensation bill arose from deaths as a result of snake bites.
Link: http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/...y-insolvent/539546-4142544-fso1g3z/index.html
KWS 1.jpe KWS 2.jpe KWS 1.jpe KWS 2.jpe
 

Shaka

Village Elder
#6
That amount of money can be used to build and equip dispensaries in those affected areas to offer immediate treatment whenever such accidents happen. Also the elite local people can be given anti-venom to adminster immidiately. Just a thought i don't know much about this things
 
L

Luther12

Guest
#14
Excuses galore

KWS blames the huge compensation claims on Parliament’s decision to amend the Wildlife Management and Conservation Act 2013 that left the taxpayer with a Sh4.83 billion bill by end of June 2016.
This is no solution, either.

The KWS wants Parliament to review the compensation rates to levels the agency can afford to pay from own revenues.
Unless they wanna antagonize local communities, that is.
 

obienga

Village Elder
#16
Michael Kipkeu, senior assistant director of community wildlife service at the KWS, last year told the National Assembly’s Environment and Natural Resources committee that the bulk of the compensation bill arose from deaths as a result of snake bites.
Link: http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/...y-insolvent/539546-4142544-fso1g3z/index.html
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KWS would be better served to set aside funding to do a multi-pronged strategy to:

1. Purchase or manufacture snake repellants and distribute them to local communities
2. Boost the local production of anti-venin and distribute the same to local communities, educate locals (the challenge may be preservation) http://reut.rs/1Fn4vbZ
3. Look into a natural approach, such as introducing kingsnakes, mongoose or honey badgers (the risk is that when the menace is eradicated the control animals may turn to prey on domestic animals).
4. Consider dispatching personnel to Vietnam or Cambodia to see how these nations manage the menace, alternatively look into an exchange program where locals in those nations can come to Kenya to hunt (if permitted) and educate locals on the same http://roadsandkingdoms.com/2016/mekong-snake-hunters
5. Employ talented locals who have expertise in dealing with snakes to train other locals and to demystify the reptiles (not advocating for this to be a food source)
6 Look at turning the menace into profitability and employment (#5 above)
 
L

Luther12

Guest
#17
KWS would be better served to set aside funding to do a multi-pronged strategy to:

1. Purchase or manufacture snake repellants and distribute them to local communities
2. Boost the local production of anti-venin and distribute the same to local communities, educate locals (the challenge may be preservation) http://reut.rs/1Fn4vbZ
3. Look into a natural approach, such as introducing kingsnakes, mongoose or honey badgers (the risk is that when the menace is eradicated the control animals may turn to prey on domestic animals).
4. Consider dispatching personnel to Vietnam or Cambodia to see how these nations manage the menace, alternatively look into an exchange program where locals in those nations can come to Kenya to hunt (if permitted) and educate locals on the same http://roadsandkingdoms.com/2016/mekong-snake-hunters
5. Employ talented locals who have expertise in dealing with snakes to train other locals and to demystify the reptiles (not advocating for this to be a food source)
6 Look at turning the menace into profitability and employment (#5 above)
Thank you! Now we’re talking! Can’t believe we still get antivenin from India in this day and age. And the thing is damn expensive, a small 10ml vial currently going for around 8k!!
 

IsMundu

Village Elder
#18
KWS would be better served to set aside funding to do a multi-pronged strategy to:

1. Purchase or manufacture snake repellants and distribute them to local communities
2. Boost the local production of anti-venin and distribute the same to local communities, educate locals (the challenge may be preservation) http://reut.rs/1Fn4vbZ
3. Look into a natural approach, such as introducing kingsnakes, mongoose or honey badgers (the risk is that when the menace is eradicated the control animals may turn to prey on domestic animals).
4. Consider dispatching personnel to Vietnam or Cambodia to see how these nations manage the menace, alternatively look into an exchange program where locals in those nations can come to Kenya to hunt (if permitted) and educate locals on the same http://roadsandkingdoms.com/2016/mekong-snake-hunters
5. Employ talented locals who have expertise in dealing with snakes to train other locals and to demystify the reptiles (not advocating for this to be a food source)
6 Look at turning the menace into profitability and employment (#5 above)
Best curated answer. Sadly, I can only give one like.
 

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