male circumcision and HIV infection

Micymas

Village Elder
#3
i think circumcision has to do with a change in mentality. kuna vyenye firimbi ikitolewa. you just behave in a more mature manner, umefi ya kuingiza nyoka kwa shimo bila kureason inaisha
 
#7
kwahivyo juu umekatwa ukuwe Dry Fry artist juu chances ya kupata kamdudu ni 40%?
Another deluded fellow, do you understand between preventing completely, immunity , reducing chances..
same way we are told to wash our hands after using the toilet and before eating , to reduce getting diseases like cholera ..

doesn't mean if you wash your hands you become immune and can go putting yourself into direct risk..
 
#9
D

Deorro

Guest
#11
Another deluded fellow, do you understand between preventing completely, immunity , reducing chances..
same way we are told to wash our hands after using the toilet and before eating , to reduce getting diseases like cholera ..

doesn't mean if you wash your hands you become immune and can go putting yourself into direct risk..

I dont even see how relevant your analogy is. Washing hands and sterilization has been shown to be effective in preventing the spread of germs since Days of Louis Pasteur and Joseph Lister. While fucking without a condom has been shown to be a highly effecting way of contracting STD's
 
#12
I dont even see how relevant your analogy is. Washing hands and sterilization has been shown to be effective in preventing the spread of germs since Days of Louis Pasteur and Joseph Lister. While fucking without a condom has been shown to be a highly effecting way of contracting STD's
if course you can't see , my point is that they reduce the chances... no method is 100% ...
so if wash your hands and eat contaminated food you will not get sick???
Same thing about circumcision and hiv, but its a probability game.. you may get or not get at all..

Saa zingine you don't have to put stupid arguments across then start mentioning Louis Pasteur ili tuskie unajua..

Learn to convert info you get to knowledge..
 
D

Deorro

Guest
#15
if course you can't see , my point is that they reduce the chances... no method is 100% ...
so if wash your hands and eat contaminated food you will not get sick???
Same thing about circumcision and hiv, but its a probability game.. you may get or not get at all..

Saa zingine you don't have to put stupid arguments across then start mentioning Louis Pasteur ili tuskie unajua..

Learn to convert info you get to knowledge..

there is nothing your point proves. there is no one who can scientifically explain how circumcision helps in prevention of HIV, hata wewe mwenyewe hujasema hapa. All those studies are just hypotheses.

HIV spread fast in most African countries and gays of America because the governments ignored it. Hata kenya moi never acknowledged it for long. Now compare to Senegal who had a president who prepared his country in advance. here are 2 articles on how Senegal managed to keep the rates of infection low, No one mentions circumcision

first article is from 2001 https://www.prb.org/assessingsenegalsantiaidssuccesses/
2nd is one from the economist in 2018 https://www.economist.com/middle-ea...01/how-a-small-african-nation-is-beating-aids

kama huwezi ona ya the economist juu ya paywall then soma hapa

AS A middle-class Senegalese man, Salou (not his real name) was rather proud of his roundness in 2002. But by 2003 his clothes were falling off. He got tested and found he had AIDS. His pregnant wife was also infected with HIV. They went to Dakar, Senegal’s capital, and she was put on antiretroviral drugs to prevent the infection of her unborn child. “When my son was born he tested negative, thank God,” exclaimed Salou.

The hopeful tale of Salou’s baby is far from universal. Although west and central Africa have long had a lower prevalence of HIV than the south and east (see map), the region still has a stubbornly high rate of new infections. In south and east Africa close on 20m people have the virus, almost four times more than in west and central Africa. From this high base, the number of new infections each year in the south and east has fallen by 29% since 2010, to 790,000. Alas, new infections in west and central Africa have fallen just 9%, to 370,000. Moreover, about 310,000 people die from HIV-related illnesses each year in west and central Africa, compared with 420,000 a year in east and southern Africa. This high toll is prompting urgent calls from global bodies such as UNAIDS and UNICEF for a new approach.


An example of that may be found in Senegal, which has cut new infections by almost three-quarters since 2010, leaving it with one of the least-afflicted populations in Africa. Whereas 4.3% of people in sub-Saharan Africa are HIV-positive, the prevalence in Senegal is just 0.4%.

Senegal may be poor but its HIV prevention and treatment system punches above its weight. It was the first country in sub-Saharan Africa to start a government-backed programme to treat people with antiretrovirals in 1998, not just prolonging the lives of those with HIV but reducing the chances that they would pass it on. In a bold move in 2003 it made the treatment free, several years before the World Health Organisation recommended that countries do so.

It has also pushed back social taboos by ensuring that drug users and sex workers are treated. Prostitution is legal in Senegal, so long as sex workers have health check-ups every three months. If they get HIV, they are not driven underground, where they might continue to spread the disease. Instead they are allowed to work while being given free treatment, which makes them less infectious. As a result, HIV prevalence among sex workers dropped from 28% in 2002 to 7% in 2016, according to UNAIDS. Drug users are given free syringes, so they are less tempted to use dirty ones.

Senegal’s decentralised health-care system helps, says Ibrahima Traoré of the Social Polytechnic Institute of Hygiene in Dakar. The number of sites offering voluntary counselling and testing increased by 600% in the four years to 2010.

One thing that Senegal has done remarkably well is to involve a wide range of groups in tackling the virus. Marabouts (imams) talk about HIV in mosques. Women’s groups try to find unregulated sex workers and Senegal’s famous wrestling groups teach men about the risks of unsafe sex. This use of civil society is something that is sorely lacking elsewhere in the region, says Nathalie Cartier of Médecins Sans Frontières.

To be sure, there is work to be done. About half of people infected with HIV are still not being treated. Only about a quarter of children with the virus are getting medication for it. And g** men are afraid to ask for advice because homosexuality is punishable by up to five years in jail. Nonetheless, Senegal has shown that even a poor country can curb the epidemic.
 

uhondo

Village Elder
#19
i think circumcision has to do with a change in mentality. kuna vyenye firimbi ikitolewa. you just behave in a more mature manner, umefi ya kuingiza nyoka kwa shimo bila kureason inaisha
This.

Its nothing but genital mutilation. The destruction of perhaps the most erogenous tissue the human male has.

Male genital mutilation must end.

Eti circumcision stopping HIV :D

sijatahiri na sikati
Kabisa.
 

Veccino

Village Elder
#20
there is nothing your point proves. there is no one who can scientifically explain how circumcision helps in prevention of HIV, hata wewe mwenyewe hujasema hapa. All those studies are just hypotheses.

HIV spread fast in most African countries and gays of America because the governments ignored it. Hata kenya moi never acknowledged it for long. Now compare to Senegal who had a president who prepared his country in advance. here are 2 articles on how Senegal managed to keep the rates of infection low, No one mentions circumcision

first article is from 2001 https://www.prb.org/assessingsenegalsantiaidssuccesses/
2nd is one from the economist in 2018 https://www.economist.com/middle-ea...01/how-a-small-african-nation-is-beating-aids

kama huwezi ona ya the economist juu ya paywall then soma hapa
The inner surface of the foreskin contains Langerhans' cells with HIV receptors, these cells are likely to be the primary point of viral entry into the penis of an uncircumcised man
 

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