PEP

AFI

Village Elder
#42
you dead, HIV virus IS probably replicating in your body right now...
Hehehe ninefika VCT nikamwambia daktari shida zangu....aliponiskiza alicheka na kunishow kuwa as long as there was no blood involved and I had protected myself during intercourse, then I there is no need to worry about anything.....I was just being needlessly paranoid because of a kiss.....
 
#46
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT PRE -EXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS (PrEP)
Good morning friends .
As a counselor, l felt it worth to capacity build most of my friends, colleagues and clients.
Plus the weather is conducive am certain l can take few minutes of your morning hours.


What is PrEP?

PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. PrEP is anti-HIV medication taken by HIV negative people who are at high risk of HIV infection to reduce their chances of becoming infected.

How is PrEP different from regular ARV drugs?

PrEP is oral ARV medication used for HIV negative people for HIV prevention. However, the same ARV medication can be used by HIV positive people in combination with additional ARV drugs.

How is PrEP (Pre Exposure Prophylaxis) different from Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP)?

Even though PrEP and PEP are both taken by HIV negative people to prevent HIV infection, they are different.

PrEP is used by HIV negative people who are at ongoing risk of HIV before exposure to reduce their chances of getting HIV.

PEP is used by HIV negative people after a possible exposure to HIV but must be taken within 72 hours.

How does PrEP work?

When a person is exposed to HIV through blood, sexual intercourse or coming into contact with infected body fluid, PrEP significantly reduces the chances of being infected with the HIV by killing the virus before it establishes infection.

What are the benefits of PrEP?

PrEP can help people who are HIV-negative with ongoing risk of HIV infection to remain HIV negative.
It is more effective when combined with other prevention methods such as condoms.
PrEP offers

● Decreased anxiety

● Increased communication, disclosure, trust

● Increased self-efficacy

Among HIV discordant couples, PrEP is a means to

● Reduce risk of HIV transmission

● Meet their fertility desires

● Cope with HIV Sero-discordance.

When can I use PrEP?

Any person who is at high risk for acquiring HIV, and meets ANY of the following indications;

• Has a sexual partner who is known HIV positive and either: not on ART, has not been on ART for 6 months,
Suspected of poor adherence to ART, or who has not achieved viral suppression.

• Sexual partner(s) are of unknown HIV status and are at high-risk for HIV infection i.e. has multiple sexual partners, has had STIs, engages in transactional sex, injects drugs

• Engaging in transactional sex (sex in exchange of gifts etc.)

• History of recent sexually transmitted infection

• Recurrent use of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP)

• History of sex while under the influence of alcohol or recreational drugs as a habit

• Inconsistent or no condom use or unable to negotiate condom use during intercourse with persons of unknown HIV status

• Injecting drug use where needles and syringes are shared

• A discordant couples (where one partner is infected with HIV and the other is not) who are trying to conceive

Can I use PrEp with other medicines?

• It is important to seek doctors’ advice on which medicines one can use together with PrEP

When should I not use PrEP?

• You should not use PrEP if:

If you are HIV positive

If you do not know their HIV status

If you cannot use your PrEP pill daily

If you have been advised by a health care provider not to use PrEP

Should I use PEP if I suspect that am exposed to HIV when taking PrEP?

Ideally, if you are taking PrEP every daily as prescribed, you do not need to use PEP because PrEP already provides a high degree of protection from any potential HIV exposure.

Continue taking your PrEP pill and discuss with your healthcare provider if you are concerned about possible HIV infection

What are the side effects of PrEP?

Some people who take PrEP experience side effects that last for a short period. These may include headache, weight loss, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal discomfort and often reduce or stop after a few weeks of taking the PrEP.

Inform your provider about any discomfort that persists or if you are concerned about how you feel after starting PrEP.

How should I take PrEP Pills?
The PrEP Pill should be taken once a day for as long as a person remains at risk of HIV infection (or as advised by the Health care provider). You should not take 2 pills at the same time or on the same day to make up for a missed dose.

Can I still use condoms when taking PrEP?

PrEP does not protect users from STI or pregnancy. PrEP is provided as part of combination prevention including condom use, VMMC, risk reduction counselling and support etc.

Does PrEP contribute to increase in risky sexual behavior?

PrEP is provided part of a package of combination prevention including risk reduction counselling and support. Provided this way, PrEP does not contribute to behavioural disinhibition and risk taking.

Am I protected from HIV if I miss a PrEP pill or pills?

When you miss one or more pills, you greatly reduce the ability of the PrEP to provide you with full protection against HIV infection.

Evidence has showed that PrEP provides the best protection from HIV if it is taken consistently every day.

Can I share PrEP with others?

PrEP should only be taken by the person prescribed and should not be shared with others. Everyone who wants to use PrEP should discuss the intention with a health provider.

How long can I take PrEP?

Someone can take PrEP for as long as they remain at risk of HIV infection.

However it is important to continue consulting a health provider for advice.

Can I use PrEP along with other medicines?

It is important to seek doctors’ advice on which medicines one can use together with PrEP

When should I stop/discontinue taking PrEP?

You should stop/ discontinue PrEP if you meet ANY of the following criteria are met:

• HIV positive

• If you reduce your risk for getting infected with HIV

• If the health care provider informs you that your kidney (Renal) function is low after doing some test

• If you request to stop

• If you are not adhering to the drugs well

• If you are in a discordant relationship and your HIV positive partner has achieved sustained viral suppression. But you should continue to consistently use condom

Can a pregnant woman take PrEP? What happens if a woman who is taking PrEP becomes pregnant?

Yes, if you are pregnant or intending to get pregnant and your partner is HIV positive, you can take PrEP.

Can One Develop Resistance to PrEP

• Resistance occurs sometimes when antiretroviral agents are used for treatment.

• Extremely rare with PrEP, and limited to those with unrecognized acute HIV infection when starting PrEP.

– Resistance can only occur if there is continued PrEP use in the background of unrecognized HIV infection.

• The benefits of PrEP far outweigh the risk and concerns about drug resistance.

For Further details, kindly contact
Caro Obare
0780815229
 
#47
Hehehe ninefika VCT nikamwambia daktari shida zangu....aliponiskiza alicheka na kunishow kuwa as long as there was no blood involved and I had protected myself during intercourse, then I there is no need to worry about anything.....I was just being needlessly paranoid because of a kiss.....
:D:D:D You actually went to see a medic?!

Well, you will soon make lots of foolish decisions engage in risky behaviors, and still turn out okay without having to subject yourself to PEP. Strive to always use protection.