Pictures of the Day: 600 Grosser Benz shipped to Germany

#7
Juzi we tried rescuing an Allion from the mud in similar fashion.
By the time we were done it had changed shape. Very flimsy body panels.
:D:D
Gari zingine ni born tao .i once borrowed a friend toyota wish nifike mushatha ile gari ni stupid kubeba mzigo kwa boot haiwes panda mlima na hakujanyesha inainuka mbele so tyres are just air spinning .I had to look for locals wakalie bonnet ndio mguu zikanyange chini.
 
#10
I have driven 1970s vehicles, i have driven 1980s vehicles, and I have driven modern vehicles including the allion being discussed here in mud. The moderns one dont suffer failure in mud easily and have more power. Most old vehicles are easily broken by mud. You will suffer an overheated or damaged engine often, overheated and damaged ignition coil, a damaged or wet distributor, over-flooded carburetor due to flooring the accelerator, snapped shafts or worn shaft, damaged steering relay or steering mechanism out of order, burnt clutch, sliping clutch that neither disengages nor locks. newer engines give more power and are more reliable in mud, the power steering makes things easy in mud. I have seen a drivers hand broken by a landrover series 109 steering. Steering inakuendesha si wewe unaiendesha. Efficiency ata usiseme. A carburetor vehicle can burn your pockets dry in mud. the only advantage is that old cast iron block engines are easily repaired and remachined.
When it comes to the body, modern cars may have thinner panels to save weight but a stronger structure design. like if you hit a 1980s door from the side with a modern car it will just carve in while for the modern car you might just need to wipe the foreign paint off. old cars with premium aluminuim body are easier to straighten and dont tear on bending and therefore seem durable. Old cars have metallic bumpers bolted to chassis and you can push on them forever and wont damage them. modern cars have plastic bumpers easily damaged in pushing and pulling.
When I dealt with old generation cars only i thought new ones are weaker, delicate and unreliable based on the fact that they are automatic, have power steering and have plastic bumpers. Ilikuwa tu ignorance na being a sticker to old stuff. Wangapi hapa wamenunua meno ya gearbox automatic? They hardly fail unless they have known issues like volkswagen
 
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Luther12

Guest
#14
How did they allow this vehicle to run into such a state of disrepair???
Go to any government car yard and you will see vehicles with grass growing on the seats, reason? There was no money to buy a new battery
Where I am there was this newish but abandoned double cabin GK D-Max. I thought it had suffered a catastrophic engine failure. Ilikuwa chini ya miti with dry leaves and dust all over. Then one day one of the drivers came with a new Exide battery, opened bonnet, connected it and cranked it up. Ilichapa ‘one kick’ as Njoro wa Grogan would say. Only then did I learn the reason why it had been abandoned: it simply needed its battery replaced. Yaani gari mpya ililala pale almost 5yrs kwa sababu ya battery tu, sth that costs 7k (N-70). Meantime, our agricultural extension officers have no vehicles with which to visit and assist our farmers!
 
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Luther12

Guest
#15
Even Presidential vehicles will rot if new ones are bought, the old ones go to transport Ministry for boarding and eventual auction. This process can take decades.
Often by design. The most recent amendments to the Public Procurement & Asset Disposal Act have done away with the Board of Survey, replacing it with a Committee in an attempt to hasten the process and improve efficiency. What I find funny, however, is that the Minister is yet to formulate new Regulations so we have a situation where a new Act is being used alongside old (outdated?) regulations.
 

mtadao

Village Elder
#17
Where I am there was this newish but abandoned double cabin GK D-Max. I thought it had suffered a catastrophic engine failure. Ilikuwa chini ya miti with dry leaves and dust all over. Then one day one of the drivers came with a new Exide battery, opened bonnet, connected it and cranked it up. Ilichapa ‘one kick’ as Njoro wa Grogan would say. Only then did I learn the reason why it had been abandoned: it simply needed its battery replaced. Yaani gari mpya ililala pale almost 5yrs kwa sababu ya battery tu, sth that costs 7k (N-70). Meantime, our agricultural extension officers have no vehicles with which to visit and assist our farmers!
The government will buy many vehicles but provide very little for operation and maintenance. That is the reason you will see new vehicles abandoned because they is no money for service.
 

mtadao

Village Elder
#18
Often by design. The most recent amendments to the Public Procurement & Asset Disposal Act have done away with the Board of Survey, replacing it with a Committee in an attempt to hasten the process and improve efficiency. What I find funny, however, is that the Minister is yet to formulate new Regulations so we have a situation where a new Act is being used alongside old (outdated?) regulations.
That board of survey is a big joke. The members usually set a reserve price for whatever is to be disposed through auction and then use proxies to buy the items
 
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Luther12

Guest
#19
That board of survey is a big joke. The members usually set a reserve price for whatever is to be disposed through auction and then use proxies to buy the items
Never seen the need for proxies hata. There used to be a provision for employees of that dep’t to be given priority in disposal of excess/ unserviceable stores. Not sure if it’s still there though.
 

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