Remember those days?

Punda

Village Elder
#1
Back in the 1980s and 1990s there were postage stamp dispensers outside post offices. You inserted coins and it gave you stamps. While I was in High School Postage stamps were equivalent to CASH. We used Colgate toothpaste to erase used stamp ink stamped by the postal workers, this was a side hustle in school. There were specialized forgers who made old stamps look like new ones. I miss those days.

Later in the 1990s innovative Kenyans used to confuse Coin operated phones by gluing together two 50 cent coins to make the phone assume it has been fed with Ksh 10 coin, I guest it operated by weighing the coins

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#5
Back in the 1980s and 1990s there were postage stamp dispensers outside post offices. You inserted coins and it gave you stamps. While I was in High School Postage stamps were equivalent to CASH. We used Colgate toothpaste to erase used stamp ink stamped by the postal workers, this was a side hustle in school. There were specialized forgers who made old stamps look like new ones. I miss those days.

Later in the 1990s innovative Kenyans used to confuse Coin operated phones by gluing together two 50 cent coins to make the phone assume it has been fed with Ksh 10 coin, I guest it operated by weighing the coins

View attachment 243743 View attachment 243745
It was the best innovation hehe
 
#8
Maisha ya zamani ilikuwa ngumu. You go through all the hustle of erasing stamps so that the recipient of the letter can get the message a week later or even more if the letter gets posted to Busia instead of Mombasa. Alafu kuna wale wa zamani kutuliko when there were few industries in Kenya. People used to make everything from scratch including soap, cooking fat, flour etc. If you wanted to cook ugali you take your grains to the millstone at the river and grind the maize yourself. Cooking oil was made from sheep fat and there was no salt for seasoning your vegetables. So people used ash to make seasoning. Hata ladies used something called a hot comb to straighten their hair.
 
#9
Maisha ya zamani ilikuwa ngumu. You go through all the hustle of erasing stamps so that the recipient of the letter can get the message a week later or even more if the letter gets posted to Busia instead of Mombasa. Alafu kuna wale wa zamani kutuliko when there were few industries in Kenya. People used to make everything from scratch including soap, cooking fat, flour etc. If you wanted to cook ugali you take your grains to the millstone at the river and grind the maize yourself. Cooking oil was made from sheep fat and there was no salt for seasoning your vegetables. So people used ash to make seasoning. Hata ladies used something called a hot comb to straighten their hair.
On the other hand, people were more industrious and relied more on natural products. All the soap, cooking oil and flour that we buy form the shops nowadays are full of harmful ingredients that someone added to make a quick shilling.
 

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