TBT NEMIS edition

Meria Mata

Elder Statesman
#82
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How history disappears.. when your kids see this, they won't know that the tyres had soap water inside and the sticks would occasionally jam into your abdomen.
That to brake, you'd press the sticks together..
That to go over a bump, you'd have to lower yourself..
That you'd hammer and flesh out the ends that go into the tyre for a smoother ride..
sisi kwetu tulikua tunatumia mti ya "Muthakwa"
i need to go back to my roots, cant remember the last time i saw a muthakwa, i remember it smelt real bad
 

Meria Mata

Elder Statesman
#84
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The smaller building to the right. I don't think it still stands. Perhaps demolished to make way for larger parking? Whats the story behind it?

The Cathedral Basilica of the Holy Family is a Roman Catholic cathedral and basilica dedicated to the Holy Family located around City Square in Nairobi, Kenya. The basilica is the seat of the Archdiocese of Nairobi.

The holy Family minor basilica parish is the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Nairobi. The current church as it stands was built in the 1940s and 1950s, with interruptions during the country’s liberation struggle for independence. The story of the construction of the church goes back to 1899, where the once tiny rail workers camp was growing in leaps and bounds. This impromptu settlement of the swampy plain (Nairobi), was an opportunity for the Catholic Church to cater for the religious needs of the community.

Under the administration of the Holy Ghost Fathers, in 1904, brother Josaphat, C.S.S.P (Holy Ghost Missionary) was entrusted with the building of the church. With a sitting capacity of 300-400 people, it was the first stone building in Nairobi.

The structure of the current church was constructed by a British firm, Mowlem construction International while the architectural work was designed by Mrs. Dorothy Hughes of Hughes & Polkinghorne Architects. The church as it stands today has a sitting capacity of 3000 – 4000 people.

The administration of the church was under the Holy Ghost Fathers from 1904-1991. The first baptism was documented in 1906, two years after the establishment of the first church building. The first marriage was conducted in 1908, while the first group of Christians was confirmed in 1923. Archbishop JJ McCarthy, (a Holy Ghost Missionary) was the first Archbishop of Archdiocese of Nairobi.

source: holyfamilybasilica.info
cc: @Guru
 

Meria Mata

Elder Statesman
#85
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This is to the memory of the native African troops who fought; to the carriers who were the hands and feet of the army and to all other men who served and died for their king and country in Eastern Africa in the Great War, 1914-1918. If you fight for your country, even if you die, your sons will remember your name.”

These words are inscribed on the “Askari Monument” standing on Kenyatta Avenue facing Bank of India. On the right hand side of the monument is an insignia with the words “Myrander SC, 1924”, indicating the pseudonym of the designer, British sculptor, James Alexander Stevenson and the year the monument was made.

The monument was erected on site in 1928 in honour of the Kings African Rifles and Carrier Corps who served in World War 1. The three African men represent a porter, an askari (a fighting man) and a gun carrier.

Interestingly, the men are not identified by name or rank as is often the case with statues. Perhaps this would have elevated them to the giddy heights of heroes, which was not the intention.

There are similar statues which were erected at the same time in Mombasa and Dar-es-Salaam. The British were lured into a senseless sideshow in East Africa by the Germans who hoped to distract resources from the main war arena in Europe.

Dubbed the East African Campaign, the British relied heavily on poorly trained and equipped African soldiers (askaris) and porters (of the Carrier Corps) to provide ground cover and support under treacherous conditions.

Africans were enlisted by force into service and in the course of the war more than 30,000 askaris and 400,000 porters were recruited. For some of the Africans, this provided an opportunity to escape the punitive colonial hut and poll taxes and to earn some decent money.

Once recruited, the Africans were given a few days to bid farewell to their loved ones, making it clear that they were very likely never to return.

By the end of the war close to 50,000 Africans had lost their lives through combat, disease or just disappeared in a cause they did not understand.

The term “askari” is an Indian name which loosely translated means “soldiers”. However, the name was used by colonial powers to describe the armed escort a traveller uses to accompany him into East Africa comprising free black men, natives of Zanzibar, or freed slaves from the interior.

They were armed and equipped like soldiers but they would engage themselves also as servants. To be honest the name was a derogatory reference to an African soldier.

After the end of the war, British soldiers were decorated and rewarded generously with the government setting up a Soldier Settlement Scheme which provided favourable terms for settlement in Kenya and elsewhere.

In contrast, only long serving askaris had small pensions set aside, benefited in preferential hiring in the colonial service, and sometimes even small land grants to aid in their retirement.

source: abacus.co.ke
 

oboho

Village Elder
#92
Something I came across about Eastleigh

Somalis’ ‘Conquest’ Of Eastleigh, And Horses:

During the pre-colonial times, Somalis were just about the only indigenous community with the experience and mastery of handling horses.

In fact, Ret. US President Roosevelt tagged a platoon of Somalis (he called them 'native Mohammedanis') along with him in his post-presidential retirement hunting trip to East Africa. He wrote about the Cushitic community and how they related with other communities at Juja House, where he was hosted by Canadian-American tycoon William Northrup Macmillan, after whom Nairobi’s Macmillan library is named.

"...most of the boys who took care of the horses, were Somalis, whereas the cattle keepers who tended the herds of cattle were Maasai, and the men and women who worked in the fields were Kikuyus.

The three races had nothing to do with one another, and the few Indians had nothing to do with any of them.

The Kikuyus lived in their beehive huts scattered in small groups; the Somalis all dwelt in their own little village on one side of the farm; and half a mile off the Maasai dwelt in their village.

Both the Somalis and Maasai were fine, daring fellows; the Somalis were Mohammedans and horsemen; the Masai were cattle herders, who did their work as they did their fighting, on foot, and were wild heathen of the most martial type...”

In those days, a small corner of Nairobi, teemed with horses. This place was then known as Carrier Corps and played host to a cavalry regiment by the same name.

Of course, over time Africans corrupted the phrase ‘Carrier Corps’ to Kariokor, which is what the place is called today.

The foot and horse-borne Carrier Corps were tasked with transporting military supplies to frontline troops during WW1.

As years went by, Nairobi got itself a racecourse around the same place Kariokor (I believe at grounds presently partly occupied by Pumwani High School sports track).

This explains why we have Racecourse Road extending from the famous OTC bus stage towards Kariokor. We have Racecourse estate, too.

And so Kariokor became a place that was synonymous, and abuzz, with horses.

From here, Somalis employed to mind the horses would after sunset retreat to their small village nearby.

Gradually, their population grew. Few people took notice.

And so, gradually, present-day Eastleigh became synonymous, and abuzz, with a growing community of Somalis.

In his book, The East Africa Protectorate, Sir Charles Elliot (pictured), who became Commissioner of British East Africa between 1900 and 1904, described Somalis thus:

“(Somalis) contrive to be at the same time the wildest and most civilised of Africans. In race they are what, for want of a better word, must be described as Hamitic, and, though dark, are sharply distinguished from all negro tribes by their clear-cut and often beautiful features. Some of the young men of the Biskaya section, whom I have seen near Lamu, might have posed as.....cast in dark bronze.

When the Somalis come into towns they at once put themselves on the same level of civilisation as the Arab, wear white robes, and show a great aptitude for commerce, particularly cattle-trading.

In externals, they are ostentatiously devout Moslems, and they show a knowledge of European law, and a power of using it to their advantage, which is without parallel among the natives of East Africa, and is only rivaled among Indians.

Also, they are very quarrelsome. But once back in their deserts, they appear to drop all these town habits, and show no inclination to raise their lives to a higher level of civilisation, but live as cattle-herding nomads, chiefly remarkable for the extreme lightness of their baggage and celerity of their movements.

Added to this, they are characterised by a pride, independence, and fanaticism most unusual in this part of Africa. It is to be hoped that in the future we may find some means of utilising this undoubtedly talented race. Hitherto, our dealings with them have not been conspicuous for success, and have usually consisted of campaigns, lightly undertaken....”
 

1776

Village Sponsor
#94
View attachment 158944
Lord Delamere with Kenya's first president Jomo Kenyatta

When the first white settlers started farming in Kenya in the early twentieth century, their enterprise was far from successful. Potatoes were tried, but they died of blight. At his first farm at Njoro Lord Delamere decided to raise sheep. He ordered Ryeland rams from England; and from New Zealand, Leicester, Lincoln and Romney March rams. The English batch arrived early in 1904 under the care of a shepherd, Sammy McCall. They were joined later that year by 500 pure-bred merino ewes from New Zealand, as well as Hereford cattle from England. The cost of all this was borne by Delamere mortgaging his English estate.

Soon the sheep began to sicken and die. Why? The local name for the land Delamere had bought was ‘angata natai emmin’, Maasai for ‘the plain of the female rhino without any milk’. The Maasai had never grazed their flocks in the area Delamere occupied. His merinos got footrot, his Ryelands lung disease and all his sheep had worms and harboured a grub which hatched in sinews. Four-fifths of the merinos died, as well as many of the others.

It was not until 1925 that the disease suffered by his livestock was identified, by the Rowett Institute in Aberdeen. It was named ‘Nakuruitis’, and was found to be caused by the land being deficient in minerals, mostly cobalt. Not until then was the disease conquered by giving animals mineral supplements. Meanwhile, at Njoro Delamere turned to cattle. He imported more Herefords, crossing them with native cattle. Unfortunately the native cattle gave the imported ones pleuro-pneumonia, while Redwater fever felled his imported Shorthorns. But some survived and gradually a grade herd was built up. This, too, was a failure because East Coast fever struck, for Njoro was infested with the ticks carrying the disease.

Delamere quickly decided that the land was to blame and, facing the inevitable, he looked for another area where he could buy land. He was allocated land near Elementaita, which he called Soysambu. It is an area still farmed by his descendants. At Soysambu Delamere turned to wheat farming. He made a furrow three miles long, ploughed by an old steam engine originally used in constructing the railway. The engine proved to be impractical, so he used a thousand bullocks instead. But who could drive the bullocks? The Boers beginning to come to the Eldoret area were skilled managers of bullocks and could be employed on piece work. Consequently 1,200 acres of wheat were sown, and binders and threshers were imported at great expense. Again, there was disappointment, for the wheat was infected with rust and destroyed. Delamere did not give up. Employing a scientist, he established a laboratory at Njoro and began to breed rust-resistant varieties of wheat, importing different strains from all over the world. Within three years he had harvested two trainloads of wheat. But he was £40,000 in the red and he had lost most of his lands in England. When he died in 1931 he was £500,000 in debt to the bank – an enormous sum in those days. His experiments, and those of other early white farmers, nonetheless established modern agriculture in Kenya.

source: oldafricamagazine.com
If it was an African angesema ni Mungu na ni laana. Huyu aliidentify the root cause, solved it and prospered.
 

1776

Village Sponsor
#95
View attachment 158952
How history disappears.. when your kids see this, they won't know that the tyres had soap water inside and the sticks would occasionally jam into your abdomen.
That to brake, you'd press the sticks together..
That to go over a bump, you'd have to lower yourself..
That you'd hammer and flesh out the ends that go into the tyre for a smoother ride..
sisi kwetu tulikua tunatumia mti ya "Muthakwa"
i need to go back to my roots, cant remember the last time i saw a muthakwa, i remember it smelt real bad
You have taken me way way back my friend. Look at the kid in the black shirt. So excited and happy. This pic warms my soul.
 

4makind

Village Elder
#96
In 2014 Ugandan politician Kizza Besigye made headlines here in the country when 22 year old photojournalist at the Standard Media group, Jeff Ochieng’ was believed to be his son due to their striking resemblance.

Jeff, whose mother had passed many years ago before she could tell her who his father was, told his story to a Ugandan newspaper. This attracted massive response and the Ugandan politician came out to say that he would be willing to meet up with Jeff.

The two finally met over a weekend at the politician’s home and took photos including an epic selfie that would make it even harder to believe they are not related.
View attachment 158841
They should measure DNA........how come?? in addition to their remarkable resemblance, both have red lips, lighter nose complexion and even that yellowish tint in the eyes
 

emali

Village Elder
In race they are what, for want of a better word, must be described as Hamitic, and, though dark, are sharply distinguished from all negro tribes by their clear-cut and often beautiful features. Some of the young men of the Biskaya section, whom I have seen near Lamu, might have posed as.....cast in dark bronze.
Could this be why most negroes here want to look somali, some sort of inferiority complex?
 

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