Theodore ni kubaya I say. Na nilikuambia juzi ukae chonjo.

patco

Village Chief
#21
By the way hii ni kitu imefanywa serious study: Socialists and their aggression online.

I read in a recent article that socialists and their supporters are often the crudest folks online. Hata online gaming jamaa wa Russia hushika nare na kutukana kila mtu and their mothers. Ama wakishindwa they hack the game or all their players abandon the game all at once.

If you visit a Russian newspaper comment section... kila kitu ni g** insults... followed by, I'll chop your parents heads off... I wish you were here so I could kill you personally... you should be dying in a hard labour camp... etc etc

Na saa hizo news yenyewe ni kuhusu some drunk teenager who did something silly.

Can't have a civil debate with you socialists. And anyone who disagrees with your thoughts is a weak Western Fargot. Case in point @kanguthu here.

Lets forget that the man you all lust after Mr. Putin is not known to have ANY lady friends. He loves to take off his clothes in front of other men. He is very clean and loves fashion. He gets very angry if issues concerning his sexuality are brought up. Wacha nisiseme zaidi nisitumiwe KGB saa hii. :D:D
 

patco

Village Chief
#22
This news is nothing, Huawei is the second biggest Phone manufacturer in terms of sales. Not having Facebook apps on their Phones is not a loss to them but a loss to Facebook. How did Facebook become popular? Through collaboration with Phone manufacturers to include the apps on their phones and service providers to market them on their networks through their shady net neutrality deals(Free whatsapp when you buy bundles, Free Facebook browsing). Huawei users Can always download Facebook apps from Playstore.

Huawei can simply promote Facebook competitors like Telegram or Tiktok, it's not like Facebook is too big to fail.

also what naona nikikaa huwezi ona hata ukikaa kwa mabega ya Trump. Who is now Crying?

View attachment 241925

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/201...e-huawei-ban-would-hurt-its-android-monopoly/
https://www.theverge.com/2019/6/7/18656163/google-huawei-android-security-ban-claims



Theodore are you not aware that Huawei has reduced production. Infact wamefunga factory line zingine. It was in their newspaper not fake news CNN.
 

Ubongo

Village Elder
#25
By the way hii ni kitu imefanywa serious study: Socialists and their aggression online.

I read in a recent article that socialists and their supporters are often the crudest folks online. Hata online gaming jamaa wa Russia hushika nare na kutukana kila mtu and their mothers. Ama wakishindwa they hack the game or all their players abandon the game all at once.

If you visit a Russian newspaper comment section... kila kitu ni g** insults... followed by, I'll chop your parents heads off... I wish you were here so I could kill you personally... you should be dying in a hard labour camp... etc etc

Na saa hizo news yenyewe ni kuhusu some drunk teenager who did something silly.

Can't have a civil debate with you socialists. And anyone who disagrees with your thoughts is a weak Western Fargot. Case in point @kanguthu here.

Lets forget that the man you all lust after Mr. Putin is not known to have ANY lady friends. He loves to take off his clothes in front of other men. He is very clean and loves fashion. He gets very angry if issues concerning his sexuality are brought up. Wacha nisiseme zaidi nisitumiwe KGB saa hii. :D:D
Haiya msito hana wife
 

patco

Village Chief
#27

gashwin

Village Chief
#34
The U.S stole these ideas from who?

Start with apple, xerox, fb... stole from who?
Are you serious? Unless you mean to say they stole from Europe, who are basically the same people?
Pat Choate, Contributor
Economist and Author
Patent Theft as a Business Strategy
05/23/2010 05:12 am ET Updated May 25, 2011

America’s largest big tech corporations are now using a business technique called “efficient infringement,” which means that they calculate the benefits of stealing someone else’s patented technology against the possibility of getting caught, tried in court and being forced to pay damages and penalties. If the benefits exceed the costs, they steal.

What makes patent theft so attractive is that infringement is not a criminal act and those found guilty face no jail time. Paying up is the worst that can happen to the infringer.


The most aggressive users of this business model are fifteen of America’s largest big tech corporations. Led by Cisco, Intel, IBM, Microsoft and HP, these giants have spent millions of lobbying dollars over the past five years trying to buy legislation in Washington that would weaken the existing U.S. laws on patent infringement. Their interest is obvious since in the 13 years between 1996 and 2008, patent owners have sued these fifteen corporations 740 times for infringement and have won $4 billion in damages. Not surprisingly, these big tech corporations’ political goal is to change the law so patent theft is more difficult to prove, less costly when caught, and willful infringement virtually impossible to prove.


The principal victims of these big corporations’ “efficient infringement” approach are America’s independent inventors, small businesses and universities - the source of most breakthrough innovations and the creators of two-thirds of all new jobs in America.
This “steal-what-you-want” approach to business is spreading throughout our economy. Now, corporate behemoths in the financial services industry are using the technique and ganging up on small patent holders. Nowhere is this more evident than the case of DataTreasury Corporation, a tiny Texas company locked in battle with some of the biggest banks in the world.

As I have written before, DataTreasury’s founder invented a revolutionary check-processing system in the mid-1990s and tried to market it to high-level executives at Chase Manhattan Bank (now known as JPMorgan Chase). Instead of partnering with DataTreasury, those bankers are accused of walking off with the idea and using it to start a pair of highly successful check-processing companies of their own — companies which are now owned by the biggest banks in the nation.

According to industry sources, the banking industry is now making $2-4 billion annually because of DataTreasury’s patented check-processing technology. DataTreasury has been forced to go to court to protect its property rights, and over the years has reached settlements with JPMorgan Chase, Citibank, HSBC, and scores of other large banks.
But Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and about a dozen other banks refuse to deal with the little company. Instead of paying up, those remaining banks have played dirty. In 2007, Washington lobbyists working for the banking industry had an amendment inserted into a pending patent-reform bill that would have granted legal immunity to all of DataTreasury’s defendants. The amendment died on the floor of the U.S. Senate after the press exposed the story.
As you read this, DataTreasury is in the middle of a trial with Minneapolis-based U.S. Bank, the country’s fifth-largest financial institution.
Last week, the federal judge overseeing the case dropped a bombshell. He ruled that DataTreasury had succeeded in arguing that U.S. Bank may have conspired with the nation’s other top banks to infringe the small company’s patents. That’s a very serious charge. It helps open the door to more than $600 million in damages against U.S. Bank, and it raises questions about whether Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and the other banks going to trial with DataTreasury later this year, may have also taken part in the same conspiracy.
Whether U.S. Bank, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and a dozen other banks are guilty of infringing DataTreasury’s patent is a matter for a jury to decide. However, if the jury does conclude that they were part of a conspiracy to steal the little company’s idea, I hope that the judge and jury will impose a judgment that is big enough to scare corporate CEOs everywhere. If money is the only penalty for infringement, then a staggeringly large award is the only way to send a message to corporate America that they should avoid any conspiracy to infringe someone’s patents as though it were the Bubonic Plague.
 

patco

Village Chief
#35
how old are you? lets start from there first coz its going to be a downhill ride for you son

Jibu swali Bayeye . :D

Wacha side shows. You have made very serious allegations that the U.S has stolen ideas and then patented the stolen ideas. Can you kindly explain and support your claims. Hayo tu.

Ukianzia ni hizo company umetaja.
 

Mediocre

Village Elder
#36
Pat Choate, Contributor
Economist and Author
Patent Theft as a Business Strategy
05/23/2010 05:12 am ET Updated May 25, 2011

America’s largest big tech corporations are now using a business technique called “efficient infringement,” which means that they calculate the benefits of stealing someone else’s patented technology against the possibility of getting caught, tried in court and being forced to pay damages and penalties. If the benefits exceed the costs, they steal.

What makes patent theft so attractive is that infringement is not a criminal act and those found guilty face no jail time. Paying up is the worst that can happen to the infringer.


The most aggressive users of this business model are fifteen of America’s largest big tech corporations. Led by Cisco, Intel, IBM, Microsoft and HP, these giants have spent millions of lobbying dollars over the past five years trying to buy legislation in Washington that would weaken the existing U.S. laws on patent infringement. Their interest is obvious since in the 13 years between 1996 and 2008, patent owners have sued these fifteen corporations 740 times for infringement and have won $4 billion in damages. Not surprisingly, these big tech corporations’ political goal is to change the law so patent theft is more difficult to prove, less costly when caught, and willful infringement virtually impossible to prove.

The principal victims of these big corporations’ “efficient infringement” approach are America’s independent inventors, small businesses and universities - the source of most breakthrough innovations and the creators of two-thirds of all new jobs in America.
This “steal-what-you-want” approach to business is spreading throughout our economy. Now, corporate behemoths in the financial services industry are using the technique and ganging up on small patent holders. Nowhere is this more evident than the case of DataTreasury Corporation, a tiny Texas company locked in battle with some of the biggest banks in the world.

As I have written before, DataTreasury’s founder invented a revolutionary check-processing system in the mid-1990s and tried to market it to high-level executives at Chase Manhattan Bank (now known as JPMorgan Chase). Instead of partnering with DataTreasury, those bankers are accused of walking off with the idea and using it to start a pair of highly successful check-processing companies of their own — companies which are now owned by the biggest banks in the nation.

According to industry sources, the banking industry is now making $2-4 billion annually because of DataTreasury’s patented check-processing technology. DataTreasury has been forced to go to court to protect its property rights, and over the years has reached settlements with JPMorgan Chase, Citibank, HSBC, and scores of other large banks.
But Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and about a dozen other banks refuse to deal with the little company. Instead of paying up, those remaining banks have played dirty. In 2007, Washington lobbyists working for the banking industry had an amendment inserted into a pending patent-reform bill that would have granted legal immunity to all of DataTreasury’s defendants. The amendment died on the floor of the U.S. Senate after the press exposed the story.
As you read this, DataTreasury is in the middle of a trial with Minneapolis-based U.S. Bank, the country’s fifth-largest financial institution.
Last week, the federal judge overseeing the case dropped a bombshell. He ruled that DataTreasury had succeeded in arguing that U.S. Bank may have conspired with the nation’s other top banks to infringe the small company’s patents. That’s a very serious charge. It helps open the door to more than $600 million in damages against U.S. Bank, and it raises questions about whether Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and the other banks going to trial with DataTreasury later this year, may have also taken part in the same conspiracy.
Whether U.S. Bank, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and a dozen other banks are guilty of infringing DataTreasury’s patent is a matter for a jury to decide. However, if the jury does conclude that they were part of a conspiracy to steal the little company’s idea, I hope that the judge and jury will impose a judgment that is big enough to scare corporate CEOs everywhere. If money is the only penalty for infringement, then a staggeringly large award is the only way to send a message to corporate America that they should avoid any conspiracy to infringe someone’s patents as though it were the Bubonic Plague.
American companies do this all the time with other American companies, especially pharmaceutical companies. What I thought he meant was that the US govt is stealing patents from other countries.
 

gashwin

Village Chief
#38
What I thought he meant was that the US govt is stealing patents from other countries.
Governments around the world steal strategic technologies all the time. it is called espionage. then they have their scientists and companies reverse engineer the technology...
 

patco

Village Chief
#39
Pat Choate, Contributor
Economist and Author
Patent Theft as a Business Strategy
05/23/2010 05:12 am ET Updated May 25, 2011

America’s largest big tech corporations are now using a business technique called “efficient infringement,” which means that they calculate the benefits of stealing someone else’s patented technology against the possibility of getting caught, tried in court and being forced to pay damages and penalties. If the benefits exceed the costs, they steal.

What makes patent theft so attractive is that infringement is not a criminal act and those found guilty face no jail time. Paying up is the worst that can happen to the infringer.


The most aggressive users of this business model are fifteen of America’s largest big tech corporations. Led by Cisco, Intel, IBM, Microsoft and HP, these giants have spent millions of lobbying dollars over the past five years trying to buy legislation in Washington that would weaken the existing U.S. laws on patent infringement. Their interest is obvious since in the 13 years between 1996 and 2008, patent owners have sued these fifteen corporations 740 times for infringement and have won $4 billion in damages. Not surprisingly, these big tech corporations’ political goal is to change the law so patent theft is more difficult to prove, less costly when caught, and willful infringement virtually impossible to prove.


The principal victims of these big corporations’ “efficient infringement” approach are America’s independent inventors, small businesses and universities - the source of most breakthrough innovations and the creators of two-thirds of all new jobs in America.
This “steal-what-you-want” approach to business is spreading throughout our economy. Now, corporate behemoths in the financial services industry are using the technique and ganging up on small patent holders. Nowhere is this more evident than the case of DataTreasury Corporation, a tiny Texas company locked in battle with some of the biggest banks in the world.

As I have written before, DataTreasury’s founder invented a revolutionary check-processing system in the mid-1990s and tried to market it to high-level executives at Chase Manhattan Bank (now known as JPMorgan Chase). Instead of partnering with DataTreasury, those bankers are accused of walking off with the idea and using it to start a pair of highly successful check-processing companies of their own — companies which are now owned by the biggest banks in the nation.

According to industry sources, the banking industry is now making $2-4 billion annually because of DataTreasury’s patented check-processing technology. DataTreasury has been forced to go to court to protect its property rights, and over the years has reached settlements with JPMorgan Chase, Citibank, HSBC, and scores of other large banks.
But Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and about a dozen other banks refuse to deal with the little company. Instead of paying up, those remaining banks have played dirty. In 2007, Washington lobbyists working for the banking industry had an amendment inserted into a pending patent-reform bill that would have granted legal immunity to all of DataTreasury’s defendants. The amendment died on the floor of the U.S. Senate after the press exposed the story.
As you read this, DataTreasury is in the middle of a trial with Minneapolis-based U.S. Bank, the country’s fifth-largest financial institution.
Last week, the federal judge overseeing the case dropped a bombshell. He ruled that DataTreasury had succeeded in arguing that U.S. Bank may have conspired with the nation’s other top banks to infringe the small company’s patents. That’s a very serious charge. It helps open the door to more than $600 million in damages against U.S. Bank, and it raises questions about whether Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and the other banks going to trial with DataTreasury later this year, may have also taken part in the same conspiracy.
Whether U.S. Bank, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and a dozen other banks are guilty of infringing DataTreasury’s patent is a matter for a jury to decide. However, if the jury does conclude that they were part of a conspiracy to steal the little company’s idea, I hope that the judge and jury will impose a judgment that is big enough to scare corporate CEOs everywhere. If money is the only penalty for infringement, then a staggeringly large award is the only way to send a message to corporate America that they should avoid any conspiracy to infringe someone’s patents as though it were the Bubonic Plague.







This is a very good article hata nime bookmark for future battles ... :D:D.

Asante sana. This is an excellent article that shows how a good judicial system works. It also shows how effective patents are in protecting the small man in America. If we had courts and a press like this in Kenya si tungekuwa mbali sana?!

Judges who don't fear the big boys/ big corporations.

I read further on wikipedia that there's a judge who doubled the award given to datatreasury from $27 million to $60 million!!

Aliamua $27 million sio kiboko tosha akaifikisha $60 million.

https://www.businesswire.com/news/h...ncreases-DataTreasury’s-Jury-Award-60-Million

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/DataTreasury


Imagine without patents what small inventors go through in China.
 

Top