This is sad. How could Kenyans allow this?

#1
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Link to the facebook post

When Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th President of US arrived in Kenya for big game hunting in 1909 , he was advised to use Kiboko (whip) to the maximum since it was the only language Africans understood to stay orderly.

Edgar Beacher Bronson, an American big game hunter who had just finished his safari in Kenya before the arrival of Roosevelt, wrote:

"Roosevelt will have to close his eyes and accustom himself to occasional severe floggings of the African wapagazi (porters), for without it no safari could be held together a fortnight; discipline would soon disappear and that quickly be followed by open revolt,"

Kiboko is a flexible, but stiff straight whip cut out of hippo hide, that when used on human skin it draws blood or raises welts double its own diameter.

To justify its use on Africans Bronson claimed a black man's skin has a far coaser fibre than the white man's, and therefore endures and recovers from punishment and wounds no white man could survive.

He went on to cite his own experience in whipping African porters, claiming that most of them never held a grudge for whipping.

You order him to lie down " he goes without a murmur and uncomplaining until the flogging is finished, and often springs to his feet, draws himself up and salutes his bwana."

While Roosevelt had accepted the services of Somali servants based on Sir William McMillan's farm at Kilimambogo, his chosen head of Safari Mr. J. Cunninghame was greatly opposed to the idea and instead proposed the Waswahili.

His reason being that the Waswahili could easily take in viboko's without complaining unlike the Somali who could not stand a blow, a kick or a Kiboko. Any man who treated them badly was pretty certain to end up with a knife sticking in his ribs sooner or later.

The only person they feared and respected was their employer at Kilimambogo, Sir MacMillan, who had established extraordinary authority and influence over them as a master. But even then, he was none too safe.

Bronson also narrated how one day he punched his Somali askari in the face for passing him the wrong bullets. To his surprise the poor man while grinning in pain drew himself up and gravely said: " You are my Bwana and my father, good!"

Acccording to him he knew the response was not genuine, and it was only a matter of days, weeks or months before he ended up with a knife in his ribs. He only felt safe after his train pulled out of Nairobi on his way to America.

For a very long time physical violence against African servants was an integral and characteristic part of European domination in Kenya, and was part of a peculiar pattern of race relations.

Facebook post:
 
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#6
You order him to lie down " he goes without a murmur and uncomplaining until the flogging is finished, and often springs to his feet, draws himself up and salutes his bwana."

:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D reminds me of primary school in .ke. that was the exact script.
 
#9
View attachment 244897

Link to the facebook post

When Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th President of US arrived in Kenya for big game hunting in 1909 , he was advised to use Kiboko (whip) to the maximum since it was the only language Africans understood to stay orderly.

Edgar Beacher Bronson, an American big game hunter who had just finished his safari in Kenya before the arrival of Roosevelt, wrote:

"Roosevelt will have to close his eyes and accustom himself to occasional severe floggings of the African wapagazi (porters), for without it no safari could be held together a fortnight; discipline would soon disappear and that quickly be followed by open revolt,"

Kiboko is a flexible, but stiff straight whip cut out of hippo hide, that when used on human skin it draws blood or raises welts double its own diameter.

To justify its use on Africans Bronson claimed a black man's skin has a far coaser fibre than the white man's, and therefore endures and recovers from punishment and wounds no white man could survive.

He went on to cite his own experience in whipping African porters, claiming that most of them never held a grudge for whipping.

You order him to lie down " he goes without a murmur and uncomplaining until the flogging is finished, and often springs to his feet, draws himself up and salutes his bwana."

While Roosevelt had accepted the services of Somali servants based on Sir William McMillan's farm at Kilimambogo, his chosen head of Safari Mr. J. Cunninghame was greatly opposed to the idea and instead proposed the Waswahili.

His reason being that the Waswahili could easily take in viboko's without complaining unlike the Somali who could not stand a blow, a kick or a Kiboko. Any man who treated them badly was pretty certain to end up with a knife sticking in his ribs sooner or later.

The only person they feared and respected was their employer at Kilimambogo, Sir MacMillan, who had established extraordinary authority and influence over them as a master. But even then, he was none too safe.

Bronson also narrated how one day he punched his Somali askari in the face for passing him the wrong bullets. To his surprise the poor man while grinning in pain drew himself up and gravely said: " You are my Bwana and my father, good!"

Acccording to him he knew the response was not genuine, and it was only a matter of days, weeks or months before he ended up with a knife in his ribs. He only felt safe after his train pulled out of Nairobi on his way to America.

For a very long time physical violence against African servants was an integral and characteristic part of European domination in Kenya, and was part of a peculiar pattern of race relations.

Facebook post:
it's ironic ati theordore rosevelt found pain in watching africans being whipped but did nothing to elleviate black american suffering ........bure kabisa !
 
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#10
Don't you just love arse licking Arabs and Europeans????
Least of all quoting Colonialists???
How low can your inferiority complex go???
I can show you plenty of quotes that Praise Kikuyus and plenty that call the Levants "better than all Arabs because Syrians and Lebanese had actual civilizations" and Maasais got more praise for their warrior culture than any community in Africa.
However, I do not care for the words of actual Colonialists.
Unlike you who seeks validation from them.
 
#11
Don't you just love arse licking Arabs and Europeans????
Least of all quoting Colonialists???
How low can your inferiority complex go???
I can show you plenty of quotes that Praise Kikuyus and plenty that call the Levants "better than all Arabs because Syrians and Lebanese had actual civilizations" and Maasais got more praise for their warrior culture than any community in Africa.
However, I do not care for the words of actual Colonialists.
Unlike you who seeks validation from them.
I don't understand that either. Who fucking cares what a colonialists thinks of your people? If you take their stupid praise to heart it just means you still believe in racial hierarchy and that you're just looking for a reason for your people to feel validated in being better than other africans or whatever.
 

patco

Village Sponsor
#13
Ni juu walikuwa na gun. Hio tu. But vile babu zetu walienda Burma walirudi na ujuzi.

One could also say that communities that were cooks, watchmen and porters then are still the same today. Sijataja mtu.
 

patco

Village Sponsor
#15
Hata pale West Africa sio kila mtu alibebwa. Ni zile community subservient, soft, malleable etc.

And they are often the most superstitious.
 

Electronics4u

Village Elder
Staff member
#16
I hear the Whipping practice in the Kiambu/Muranga coffee farms ended recently. The nyabaras would whip those who were jumping from one line to another looking for a coffee bush with ripe berries so as to fill their debes faster.(kuguthagutha in kuke). They were supposed to follow an allocated line of bushes whether they had ripe berries or not.
 

xequalsx

Senior Villager
#17
Don't you just love arse licking Arabs and Europeans????
Least of all quoting Colonialists???
How low can your inferiority complex go???
I can show you plenty of quotes that Praise Kikuyus and plenty that call the Levants "better than all Arabs because Syrians and Lebanese had actual civilizations" and Maasais got more praise for their warrior culture than any community in Africa.
However, I do not care for the words of actual Colonialists.
Unlike you who seeks validation from them.
so you are anti colonial now?!thats funny considering you are using their language,whch language do kenyans worship if not english,would you trust your teachers if they didnt know english
if kikuyus could write,they would right and say the same thing about somalis,i can also post here a number of arabic,somali,greek and even chinese text talking about somalis as traders and warriors,there are actually arabic text that recorded somali epics and kingdoms,i could tell you about the greeks and so on
buuuut this thread is about how colonials saw us,aint it?they saw kenyans as submissive and unintelligent while somalis were pridefull,intelligent and had a well deserved superiority complex even towards you master the english that still owns you
 

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