Tracing a debit card fraudster

conoiseur

Village Elder
#1
Wadau is there a way to trace a fraudster after your debit card is run on an online platform like JUMIA/ALIEXPRESS etc? If yes, what's the procedure and is this done from the bank's end or the merchant's end?
 

conoiseur

Village Elder
#6
Define fraud in this instance, is it someone who got access to your debit card amd made a transfer or is it someone you paid and never delivered?
Someone got access to my cards when I was on a field trip some 2 weeks ago. I only realized later when the bank SMS started trickling in. I was able to block the card immediately before my small millions got wiped out
 
#8
What about anti-fraud departments from the bank ama all they do is resolve the dispute wanawachia hapo?
Okay, looking at it from the bank's perspective, they have no way of knowing who committed the crime. The person logged into his/her jumia/aliexpress account and changed his card details to yours then made a purchase. As far as the bank is concerned, that was you. The only way to know the person is if the bank formally asks the e-commerce platform(s) for that info. If the sites have serious privacy measures, they'll most likely decline. That's why I've always wondered why banks don't ask for a PIN before completing an online purchase, like you enter when using an ATM. That would eliminate 95% of this fraud. As things stand, all I need to do is take a photo of someone else's atm and I can successfully use it to buy things. That's a serious security lapse.
 

conoiseur

Village Elder
#9
Okay, looking at it from the bank's perspective, they have no way of knowing who committed the crime. The person logged into his/her jumia/aliexpress account and changed his card details to yours then made a purchase. As far as the bank is concerned, that was you. The only way to know the person is if the bank formally asks the e-commerce platform(s) for that info. If the sites have serious privacy measures, they'll most likely decline. That's why I've always wondered why banks don't ask for a PIN before completing an online purchase, like you enter when using an ATM. That would eliminate 95% of this fraud. As things stand, all I need to do is take a photo of someone else's atm and I can successfully use it to buy things. That's a serious security lapse.
The affected card in question was from Stanchart, however I do have another NCBA LOOP card that has OTP validation when doing online transactions. Most cards just usually go through just like that.
 

Shaka

Village Elder
#13
Okay, looking at it from the bank's perspective, they have no way of knowing who committed the crime. The person logged into his/her jumia/aliexpress account and changed his card details to yours then made a purchase. As far as the bank is concerned, that was you. The only way to know the person is if the bank formally asks the e-commerce platform(s) for that info. If the sites have serious privacy measures, they'll most likely decline. That's why I've always wondered why banks don't ask for a PIN before completing an online purchase, like you enter when using an ATM. That would eliminate 95% of this fraud. As things stand, all I need to do is take a photo of someone else's atm and I can successfully use it to buy things. That's a serious security lapse.
This is serious, all one needs is details of your card and your money is gone. Suppose your card is not connected to your phone or you change your phone number, that means you will be in darkness as thugs enjoy your sweat. Imagine a thug working in a bank or someone who can hack that info and access card details of about 100k customers. Cards are shit
 
#14
Wadau is there a way to trace a fraudster after your debit card is run on an online platform like JUMIA/ALIEXPRESS etc? If yes, what's the procedure and is this done from the bank's end or the merchant's end?
YES, although you may be out of luck. First contact your bank and let them know that your debit card has been compromised. You see, only details required to carry out online transactions are the card number, card name and CVC. Otherwise, there are no security measures such as passwords or verifications which would prevent a fraudster from using your card details.

The bank might reach out to the e-commerce platform but I'm not certain if the platform will simply handover the fraudsters information. Your best bet is to request a replacement card and request a refund for the amount stolen.
 

conoiseur

Village Elder
#16
Uko na bahati whoever used it, alitumia for shopping.
Angeenda online gambling sites angesafisha account yako na atumiwe hiyo pesa na western union.
shait. ana deposit then withdraw? Kwani those online gambling sites read the card balance prior to making deposits?
 
#18
Uko na bahati whoever used it, alitumia for shopping.
Angeenda online gambling sites angesafisha account yako na atumiwe hiyo pesa na western union.
kuna gambling site iliniosha 4k,na bado site inaendelea hata wa leo(neptunebet.com)They promise they using certain algorithms to win casino games, you subscribe and deposit money for them to gamble for you. Once I deposited , tried login in ikakataa..tried resetting password ikakataa,pesa ikakunywa maji ivo..:D:D
 

Chinja

Village Elder
#20
Minimize amount in your current account that is linked to the ATM.

I have a current and savings account. Once revenues check in I move money to the savings account and MPesa Lines. I leave a minimal amount in the current account. I plan all my online purchases and only move money to the current account for specific transactions.
 

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