while we are challenging the wild costs of burying the great footballer Joe Kadenge,

Deep sea

Village Elder
#1
we can also trace the commercialisation and pomposity of Kenyan burials in this story of Jomo Kenyatta.
#Copied
I have just read a long academic discourse written and published in 2016 by the researcher Poppy Cullen.Yes it is true that Western researchers have more access to our history,really? Is this true even today,the age of the internet?Anyway,Pullen's research focused on Jomo Kenyatta's funeral,preparation for his death by the British government and Kenya's top political class.In 1968,Jomo Kenyatta had a major stroke and that was the first time three Kenyan cabinet ministers met as a group and on several occasions later to plan with the British authorities an Edwardian-Elizabethan pomp and pageantry in Jomo's funeral.The British press wrote such strange stories like the plans to transport the same gun carriage that was used in Winston Churchill's funeral to be used at Kenyatta's.Indeed the British government sent an expensive gun carriage befitting royalty to Kenyatta's funeral in 1978.Historians have never debated the cost or some of the post colonial remnants of British power over the final rites given to Jomo Kenyatta. British newspapers were busy reporting the moment of "diplomatic near-embarrassment. Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, was seated only two places from Idi Amin—the president of Uganda and a man who had established himself in the British popular imagination as the embodiment of all that was wrong with post-colonial African leadership. The Times reported excitedly that Charles ‘narrowly missed having his hand seized’ by Amin"
Jomo Kenyatta had just suffered a second major stroke on May 1968.He was still enjoying his British imported spirits but generally it was assumed that his health was not that bad.But according to Cullen,"To put it bluntly, it was not predicted that Kenyatta would remain alive for long. Kenyatta never wanted to plan for his death; indeed, it was often one of the frustrations of British and Kenyan policy-makers that he did not prepare for this by unreservedly nominating his successor"
Njoroge Mungai was the main challenge to Moi in the Succession plan. He had planned the execution of Moi allies or try his best to prevent the Baringo man from ascending to power.
In the days between Kenyatta’s death and funeral, the British government was further consulted on additional aspects of the ceremonial. On the day of Kenyatta’s death, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) was asked for advice on the British model for lying in state. (Telegram no. 462, FCO to Nairobi, 22 Aug. 1978, FCO 31/2315/14).This information was duly provided by Major Mather, who had had this role at Churchill’s funeral, and who stayed up all night to write his four-page telegram dictating the British forms of ceremonial. He included information on the positioning of guards, their relief and rest patterns, transportation and visitation, with 16 officers on duty at any time.
This was sent to Brigadier Cromwell Mkungusi, who would in 1983 become chief of staff of Kenya’s armed forces, highlighting the continuing post-colonial connections between the British and Kenyan militaries.The Kenyans also requested more tangible assistance from the British military:
"the loan of a gun carriage—which of course consists of a gun and a limber—50 rounds of blank ammunition and a small team of five men which would be required to advise on the ceremonial and to train the detachments of Kenyans who would escort the gun carriage"
 
D

Deleted member 10628

Guest
#4
Johnstone kamau failed to plan for his death and burial arrangements na alikua anajua awezi toboa miaka kadhaa hapo mbele. It took the intervention of the Britons to plan ahead and they went as far as debating that matter uko Westminster. Oh pia kuna vile Amin Dada alipiga tako kando ya prince na iyo aikupendeza muzungu
 
#6
we can also trace the commercialisation and pomposity of Kenyan burials in this story of Jomo Kenyatta.
#Copied
I have just read a long academic discourse written and published in 2016 by the researcher Poppy Cullen.Yes it is true that Western researchers have more access to our history,really? Is this true even today,the age of the internet?Anyway,Pullen's research focused on Jomo Kenyatta's funeral,preparation for his death by the British government and Kenya's top political class.In 1968,Jomo Kenyatta had a major stroke and that was the first time three Kenyan cabinet ministers met as a group and on several occasions later to plan with the British authorities an Edwardian-Elizabethan pomp and pageantry in Jomo's funeral.The British press wrote such strange stories like the plans to transport the same gun carriage that was used in Winston Churchill's funeral to be used at Kenyatta's.Indeed the British government sent an expensive gun carriage befitting royalty to Kenyatta's funeral in 1978.Historians have never debated the cost or some of the post colonial remnants of British power over the final rites given to Jomo Kenyatta. British newspapers were busy reporting the moment of "diplomatic near-embarrassment. Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, was seated only two places from Idi Amin—the president of Uganda and a man who had established himself in the British popular imagination as the embodiment of all that was wrong with post-colonial African leadership. The Times reported excitedly that Charles ‘narrowly missed having his hand seized’ by Amin"
Jomo Kenyatta had just suffered a second major stroke on May 1968.He was still enjoying his British imported spirits but generally it was assumed that his health was not that bad.But according to Cullen,"To put it bluntly, it was not predicted that Kenyatta would remain alive for long. Kenyatta never wanted to plan for his death; indeed, it was often one of the frustrations of British and Kenyan policy-makers that he did not prepare for this by unreservedly nominating his successor"
Njoroge Mungai was the main challenge to Moi in the Succession plan. He had planned the execution of Moi allies or try his best to prevent the Baringo man from ascending to power.
In the days between Kenyatta’s death and funeral, the British government was further consulted on additional aspects of the ceremonial. On the day of Kenyatta’s death, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) was asked for advice on the British model for lying in state. (Telegram no. 462, FCO to Nairobi, 22 Aug. 1978, FCO 31/2315/14).This information was duly provided by Major Mather, who had had this role at Churchill’s funeral, and who stayed up all night to write his four-page telegram dictating the British forms of ceremonial. He included information on the positioning of guards, their relief and rest patterns, transportation and visitation, with 16 officers on duty at any time.
This was sent to Brigadier Cromwell Mkungusi, who would in 1983 become chief of staff of Kenya’s armed forces, highlighting the continuing post-colonial connections between the British and Kenyan militaries.The Kenyans also requested more tangible assistance from the British military:
"the loan of a gun carriage—which of course consists of a gun and a limber—50 rounds of blank ammunition and a small team of five men which would be required to advise on the ceremonial and to train the detachments of Kenyans who would escort the gun carriage"
Paragraphs madam and summary in bullets next time.
 
#11
And what do you mean when you say “killed” and if he did Thats still not enough because businesses can be built again. But he survived so it seems whatever he did worked out well for himself.
You must be very young if you don't know what moi did to kikuyu businesses. It would take too long but do some research and you will get it.
Couple of questions;
So what do you think he should have done and what would he have achieved ?
How do you rebuild a business when you have been auctioned, lost everything and you still owe the bank?
 
#12
You must be very young if you don't know what moi did to kikuyu businesses. It would take too long but do some research and you will get it.
Couple of questions;
So what do you think he should have done and what would he have achieved ?
How do you rebuild a business when you have been auctioned, lost everything and you still owe the bank?
My age is not a factor when it comes to this conversation,
I know what moi did to the kikuyu businesses but that is not the point, am talking about the kiambu mafia the group of men that wanted to kill him and executed some of his allies. It is logic 101 that you do not have mercy on a snake that tried to bite you head off especially in those times where assassinations were commonplace.
Do i really need to answer what you gain when you take out your poltical rivals?
It is definetly hard when your are bankrupt but there are always different ways you can get on your feet again.
 
#14
My age is not a factor when it comes to this conversation,
I know what moi did to the kikuyu businesses but that is not the point, am talking about the kiambu mafia the group of men that wanted to kill him and executed some of his allies. It is logic 101 that you do not have mercy on a snake that tried to bite you head off especially in those times where assassinations were commonplace.
Do i really need to answer what you gain when you take out your poltical rivals?
It is definetly hard when your are bankrupt but there are always different ways you can get on your feet again.
Age becomes a factor if you did not to get experience the moi years, it's one of those periods which are inexplicable today.
Now, what ways would one use to get back on your feet if banks have been instructed not to lend you money and individuals not to buy your property or do business with you?
 
#15
Age becomes a factor if you did not to get experience the moi years, it's one of those periods which are inexplicable today.
Now, what ways would one use to get back on your feet if banks have been instructed not to lend you money and individuals not to buy your property or do business with you?
That is why there are books, video footage, articles to research. dismissing people just because they might not have lived through an era is pathetic to say the least.

And when it comes to businesses Thats an easy question, how about the use of proxies like your friends and families that happens all the time.
 
#16
That is why there are books, video footage, articles to research. dismissing people just because they might not have lived through an era is pathetic to say the least.

And when it comes to businesses Thats an easy question, how about the use of proxies like your friends and families that happens all the time.
Reading a book and watching a movie can never ever be remotely considered equal to the actual experience .
Now I understand why you have a cavalier attitude towards the moi dictatorship. . .
Ati use proxies? That's laughable
Have you ever read 1984 by George Orwell?
That was Kenya back in the days, our parents lived in fear all the time!
 

magreb

Village Elder
#17
That is why there are books, video footage, articles to research. dismissing people just because they might not have lived through an era is pathetic to say the least.

And when it comes to businesses Thats an easy question, how about the use of proxies like your friends and families that happens all the time.
Kweli wewe ni ***i if this is how you are reasoning. Hukuwai ona fimbo ya nyayo ikichapa.
 

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