Why are most houses in the US made of wood, not mawe?

TopCat

Village Elder
#2
Most have a basement/storm cellar when hurricanes and tornedos hit. It's fairly cheaper to construct with timber in that market, it also helps during winter because they have an insulated layer in between.

Also cities and neighborhoods evolve, they tend to be easy to demolish and rebuild.

Imagine trying to demolish and rebuild houses in a place like tena or umoja.
 

Simiyu22

Village Sponsor
#3
Most of those houses have brick outside. However, the brick doesn’t make the support wall like Kenya. Stone is a poorer conductor of heat than wood. Because US temperatures are either very hot or very cold, it’s economical to use wood. In the winter, heaters are used inside the house. If you had stone, the temperature would remain very cold. The walls would be stone cold. In the summer, air conditions are used. If you had stone the walls would be burning hot.
Better in-house temperature regulation is achieved using wood.
 
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Tom Bayeye

Village Sponsor
#4
Most have a basement/storm cellar when hurricanes and tornedos hit. It's fairly cheaper to construct with timber in that market, it also helps during winter because they have an insulated layer in between.

Also cities and neighborhoods evolve, they tend to be easy to demolish and rebuild.

Imagine trying to demolish and rebuild houses in a place like tena or umoja.
Most of those houses have brick outside. However, the brick doesn’t make the support wall like Kenya. Stone is a poorer conductor of heat than wood. Because US temperatures are either very hot or very cold, it’s economical to use wood. In the winter, heaters are used inside the house. If you had stone, the temperature would remain very cold. The walls would be stone cold. In the summer, air conditions are used. If you had stone the walls would be stay burning hot.
Better in-house temperature regulation is achieved using wood.
hmmm makes sense,always wondered the same. Its safe to assume that timber is cheap i guess
 
#8
And before that DP Ruto banned logging for 3 months in 2018.

https://www.africanews.com/2018/02/26/kenya-imposes-ban-on-logging-for-90-days/

In Kenya there is never any timber or tarmac, two of the most crucial construction materials on earth!

Kenyans are forced to live in dust for generations even within the estates because tarmac is so expensive! Simple roads cost billions to construct.

Cabbro blocks are also super expensive and not durable.

Why does all this take place? Because of cartels!

Kenya has a superb oil refinery which can produce sufficient amounts of road tar enough even for export market but some fellows silently killed the refinery.

The same fellows keep a tight grip on the timber industry so as to corner the market. Is it that there is no land available for tree cultivation? No, there is more than sufficient land available.
 
#11
Most have a basement/storm cellar when hurricanes and tornedos hit. It's fairly cheaper to construct with timber in that market, it also helps during winter because they have an insulated layer in between.

Also cities and neighborhoods evolve, they tend to be easy to demolish and rebuild.

Imagine trying to demolish and rebuild houses in a place like tena or umoja.
Brick and stone can also have insulaion in between...
 
#14
Most of those houses have brick outside. However, the brick doesn’t make the support wall like Kenya. Stone is a poorer conductor of heat than wood. Because US temperatures are either very hot or very cold, it’s economical to use wood. In the winter, heaters are used inside the house. If you had stone, the temperature would remain very cold. The walls would be stone cold. In the summer, air conditions are used. If you had stone the walls would be burning hot.
Better in-house temperature regulation is achieved using wood.
True that wood is better when it comes to heat but alot of houses have brick on the inside because the difference in heat loss is negligble, only recently with new building regulations, things like Leed certificationa and zero net buildings are such minor differences considered consiquential, but even then you can still have brick on the inside for aesthetics as well as for loadbearing purposes
 
#15
It's virtually illegal to even transport timber on Kenyan roads. Logging was even banned last year :
It is not illegal to transport timber. You just require a timber movement permit which is very cheap to acquire.
The forestry department is right now prequalifyng sawmillers as they intend to reopen the forests for logging.
 

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