Now China Threatens Canada With Severe Consequences.

#1
China has warned Canada it will face severe consequences unless it releases Huawei Technologies’ chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who faces extradition to the U.S. after being arrested in the country last week.


Meng, 46, was taken into custody on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018, on behalf of the U.S., while she was transferring flights in Vancouver, the tech company said. She’s accused of trying to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran. She is the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, a former Chinese military engineer worth $3.2 billion, according to Forbes magazine.

During her bail hearing on Friday, a prosecutor for the Canadian government said U.S. charges against her have to do with Huawei using an unofficial subsidiary to access the Iran market in dealings that would contravene U.S. sanctions. The prosecutor said she is accused of fraud.

If extradited to the U.S., she could face charges of “conspiracy to defraud multiple financial institutions,” which holds a “maximum sentence of 30 years for each charge,” Reuters reported. The news of Meng’s arrest has roiled stock markets and drawn condemnation from Chinese authorities, although Trump and his top economic advisers have played down its importance to trade talks after the two leaders agreed to a truce.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...huawei-cfo-or-face-consequences-idUSKBN1O70HU
 
#6
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If extradited to the U.S., she could face charges of “conspiracy to defraud multiple financial institutions,” which holds a “maximum sentence of 30 years for each charge,”
Here, Canada might find itself in a tricky position. The charges seem very vague to date. For them to stick the alleged crime must be backed by evidence that points to the CFO directly.

Odd how the White House can reject the CIA report on Saudi Arabia, but accept the arrest of a critical Chinese individual on vague grounds.
 
#8
If Huawei is a private company, why does China directly take a position on her prosecution?
In China, the line between public and private is blurry.

Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. (/ˈhwɑːˌweɪ/; Chinese: 华为; pinyin:
Huáwéi
) is a Chinese multinational telecommunications equipment and consumer electronics company based in Shenzhen, Guangdong, South China. Ren Zhengfei, a former engineer in the Chinese People's Liberation Army, founded Huawei in 1987.

Although successful internationally, Huawei has faced difficulties and cybersecurity concerns selling in some markets (such as the United States), over allegations that its equipment may contain backdoors that could enable unauthorized surveillance by the Chinese government and by the People's Liberation Army (citing, in particular, its founder having previously worked for the Army). While the company has argued that its products posed "no greater cybersecurity risk" than those of any other vendors, Huawei stated in April 2018 that it would largely pull out of the U.S. market, due to the scrutiny having impacted its activity. Huawei's Vice-chairperson and CFO Meng Wanzhouwas arrested in Canada on December 1, 2018 at the request of the United States, which accuses her of violating US sanctions against Iran.
 
#9
I have tried to find just one article that bears any factual support of allegations against Huawei, but all I can find are US-led claims and repetitions if the same by Canada, New Zealand, Australie and Britain.

You'd think that the USA has not always pressured Microsoft, Apple, Google and others to avail client data to the CIA and FBI under the guise of national security. When that fails, it designs spyware and hacks, worldwide!

Symantec attributes 40 cyber attacks to CIA-linked hacking tools
 
#10
If Huawei is a private company, why does China directly take a position on her prosecution?
If Bill Gates were to be arrested in Maasai Mara under vague circumstances, you don't know how fast the US Ambassador would call State House.

Functioning governments always take it up for citizens traveling with their passport. Be thankful.
 
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Mjuaji

Village Sponsor
#12
If Bill Gates were to be arrested in Maasai Mara under vague circumstances, you don't knoe how fast the US Ambassador would call State House.

Functiining governments always take it up for citizens traveling with their passport. Be thankful.
Except for Kenya.
GoK has never advocated for welfare of its citizens outside its borders.
Even against shitty countries like South Sudan or Tanzania for which we have massive leverage.
 
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#16
Jesus Christ! Hamchoki na hii menstruation ya kijinga all the time? Even an article about China has to be turned into a whine against GoK?
Says the vintage prune who criticizes Kenya whenever he deems it right and forbids others to do so without his permission.

@Simiyu22 just remarked that Kenya frequently let's her subjects languish in foreign jails or in situations where they're treated inhumanely. If you have overwhelming proof that that is not the case, table it instead of insulting people.
 
#17
These are the same Chinese who are illegally detaining thousands of Rhohingya Muslims in Auschwitz type of camps.
There are no Rohingya within 1,000 km of China.You are referring to Uyghurs who are not remotely related to Rohingyas. The former are Turkic people who like in South Xijiang while the latter are Bengali speakers who live in Burma and Bangladesh.
 
#18
I have tried to find just one article that bears any factual support of allegations against Huawei, but all I can find are US-led claims and repetitions if the same by Canada, New Zealand, Australie and Britain.

You'd think that the USA has not always pressured Microsoft, Apple, Google and others to avail client data to the CIA and FBI under the guise of national security. When that fails, it designs spyware and hacks, worldwide!

Symantec attributes 40 cyber attacks to CIA-linked hacking tools
The thing is,the American Courts have ensured even the likes of Donald Trump could not force Apple to hand over private information even though the information belonged to the San Benardino shooter.There is however no law that stop them from hacking into an iPhone, but Apple is under no obligation to help them do so in any way.And even if they hacked into an iPhone and the most sensitive information is on iCloud, the security agencies can do little unless they had planted a bug long before.
This does not apply to ZTE or Huawei. Both companies, if told to hand over their servers to the CCP, they will do so in a heartbeat. Both companies owe their continued existence to the CCP. A member of the CCP sits on their boards.
If you have a Huawei phone right now, ebu try and spread anti Chinese propaganda in places like WeChat uone???
 
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